Afghan sniper who worked with UK special forces 'shot dead by Taliban'

Afghan sniper who worked with UK special forces ‘was shot dead by the Taliban after being told there was no room for him and his family on RAF flight out of Kabul

  • Noor, 29, had been a member of a British-trained Afghan unit known as CF333
  • The sniper was turned away from an RAF rescue flight as there was ‘no capacity
  • He was shot by the Taliban three times in chest and again as he lay on the ground
  • An Afghan sniper who worked with UK special forces ‘was shot dead by the talebani after being told there was no room for him and his family on RAF flight out of Kabul’.

    Noor, 29, had been a member of a British-trained Afghan unit known as CF333, but was not rescued in the airlift from Kabul airport that followed the Taliban takeover.

    His brother Shakar Chi, 36, who also worked alongside UK special forces and made it to the UK, ha detto al I tempi that Noor had waited for days for a rescue flight out of Kabul but was eventually turned away as he didn’t hold a UK passport.

    Afghan sniper Noor, 29, who worked alongside UK special forces was shot dead by the Taliban 15 days after being told there was no room for him and his family on an RAF flight out of Kabul

    Afghan sniper Noor, 29, who worked alongside UK special forces was shot dead by the Taliban 15 days after being told there was no room for him and his family on an RAF flight out of Kabul

    Noor’s brother Shakar, chi usa uno pseudonimo, boarded a flight on August 27 and was promised by a member of the British army that Noor and his family would also be on a flight ‘within 24 hours’.

    però, the next day on August 28, the day the last evacuation flights departed from Kabul airport, Shakar spoke to his brother over the phone who revealed that he hadn’t got a seat as there was ‘no capacity’.

    Shakar said that Noor told him that he had been ‘kicked outof the Baron hotel, which was being used by British diplomats and milatary to process those eligible to fly to the UK.

    Noor said over the phone that a British soldier had said: ‘There’s so many people here with a red [Britannico] passaporto. We can’t take any more people on the flight. We don’t have any capacity.

    ‘That’s why they kicked me out,’ Egli ha detto.

    Noor's brother Shakar Chi, 36, boarded a flight on August 27 and was promised by a member of the British army that Noor and his family would also be on a flight 'within 24 hours'. Nella foto, crowds of people wait outside the airport in Kabul

    Noor’s brother Shakar Chi, 36, boarded a flight on August 27 and was promised by a member of the British army that Noor and his family would also be on a flight ‘within 24 hours’. Nella foto, crowds of people wait outside the airport in Kabul

    Fifteen days later, Noor was traced to his sister’s home on the edge of the Afghan capital Kabul and murdered by the Taliban.

    He was shot three times in the chest and again as he lay on the ground by two gunmen.

    Noor is said to have been shot dead while his wife and five children, all under the age of nine – the youngest just ten days old – were at the entrance of the house.

    The murder prompted shock and anger from members of the British military, with former Colonel Ash Alexander-Cooper, OBE, a commander of specialist operations with the SAS, writing in a tweet: ‘For those leaders still unsure, this is not a game, ‘N’ was executed by the Taliban in cold blood just a few hours ago. His crime ? Years of loyal and professional service, mentored by British units.

    però, Noor was eventually turned away on the day the last evacuation flights were leaving Kabul as he didn't hold a UK passport and there was 'no capacity'. Nella foto: British troops board a flight at Kabul airport on August 28

    però, Noor was eventually turned away on the day the last evacuation flights were leaving Kabul as he didn’t hold a UK passport and there was ‘no capacity’. Nella foto: British troops board a flight at Kabul airport on August 28

    ‘There is no amnesty. Abandoned by us, this murder will not be the last.’

    ‘This is the reality of the “new” Taliban,’ Mr Alexander-Cooper said. ‘Talk of inclusivity, diversity and amnesty is a joke and some are falling for it. Wake up.’

    The murder was one in a series of revenge killings by the Taliban who have gone from house to house hunting those who worked with Western forces.

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