Amazing video shows meteor blazing in the sky above Channel Islands

Amazing video shows METEOR blazing in the sky as it soars over the Channel Islands

  • Footage was captured on Nest webcam by Jersey resident Andrew Scotts-Miller
  • It shows cars driving along a road at night while a stunning flash appears in sky
  • In August residents in Jersey were treated to a view of the Perseid meter shower
  • Amazing footage has captured the moment a blazing meteor soars over the Channel Islands.

    What at first looks like mundane footage of cars passing along a street lit road at night suddenly bursts into life when a flash of light appears in the sky.

    The flash appears to get bigger as it moves across the sky, casting a bluey-green reflection across the water.

    Within seconds the flash begins to fade before disappearing into the night sky.

    The stunning video was recorded in Jersey and inadvertently shot by a Nest webcam owned by Andrew Scotts-Miller.








    What at first looks like mundane footage of cars passing along a street lit road at night suddenly bursts into life when a flash of light appears in the sky

    What at first looks like mundane footage of cars passing along a street lit road at night suddenly bursts into life when a flash of light appears in the sky

    The flash appears to get bigger as it moves across the sky, casting a bluey-green reflection across the water

    The flash appears to get bigger as it moves across the sky, casting a bluey-green reflection across the water

    Within seconds the flash begins to fade before disappearing into the night sky

    Within seconds the flash begins to fade before disappearing into the night sky

    Mr Scotts-Miller, who lives in the island’s capital St Hellier, was sitting at home watching TV when he noticed the flash out in the sky.

    He had witnessed a similar flash, which he originally thought was a firework, earlier in the week, but it was later confirmed to be a meteor.

    Andrew immediately checked his Nest webcam pointing out from his house in St. Hellier, southbound towards Saint Aubin’s Bay.

    And he was delighted to see it had captured the stunning moment perfectly.

    He shared the footage on social media and the video had an astonishing 70,000 ビュー – そして 2,000 株式 – in a matter of hours.

    アンドリュー, a project lead for a new Air Ambulance Charity, 前記: ‘I was at home when I saw this huge ball go past my window.

    ‘We had had a Meteor the week before that I had thought was a firework, so when I saw this, I knew exactly what it was.

    ‘I checked the camera and we had caught it. The meteor was a lot more dramatic than the previous one, although it was more colourful than it appears on camera it is still great video.

    ‘I was struck by the way the meteor’s glow reflected off the water in the bay. Some of the things that nature throws at us is Incredible especially with where we are in the world.

    ‘We’re not known for the Northen Light’s or other natural phenomenon, so this was spectacular and I’m very lucky to have witnesses two meteors in the space of a week.

    The footage was recorded just weeks after those living in the Channel Islands were treated to a spectacular meteor shower.

    The Perseid meteor shower was visible in the sky above the Channel Islands last month. It peaked on August 12, when islanders could see up to 150 meteors per hour.

    Two hundred stacked digital images of long exposures show Perseid meteors crossing the sky over the stone dools in Kuklice, near the eastern city of Kratovo, Republic of North Macedonia

    Two hundred stacked digital images of long exposures show Perseid meteors crossing the sky over the stone dools in Kuklice, near the eastern city of Kratovo, Republic of North Macedonia

    The astronomical event is associated with the dusty debris left by Comet Swift-Tuttle, which orbits the sun once every 133 年.

    The meteors are shards from Comet Swift-Tuttle and some are as small as a grain of sand.

    But they are visible as they burn up when entering the earth’s atmosphere, producing a stream of light in the sky.

    The meteors are called Perseids because they seem to dart out of the constellation Perseusa constellation in the northern sky named after the Greek mythological hero Perseus.