Boris Johnson denies he dumped Tory manifesto amid social care row

Boris Johnson denies he has dumped Tory manifesto amid social care reforms row

  • Boris Johnson has watered down a promise made at the 2019 elezioni generali
  • Now people will not be ‘forced to sell a home they or their spouse is living in’
  • At PMQs, Sir Keir Starmer criticised Mr Johnson’s decision to break the promise
  • The Prime Minister insisted last night that he had not ditched the Tory manifesto in its entirety as his social care reforms were branded a ‘working-class dementia tax’.

    Boris Johnson has watered down a promise made at the 2019 general election that no one needing care would have to ‘sell their home to pay for it’.

    Anziché, he is now pledging that people will not be ‘forced to sell a home they or their spouse is living in’.

    The Prime Minister insisted last night that he had not ditched the Tory manifesto in its entirety as his social care reforms were branded a ‘working-class dementia tax’

    The Prime Minister insisted last night that he had not ditched the Tory manifesto in its entirety as his social care reforms were branded a ‘working-class dementia tax’

    The Government’s landmark social care plans have been at the centre of a row since it emerged they would not be as generous to the less well-off as thought.

    Mr Johnson has broken a series of promises made at the election, including those on national insurance, pensioni, foreign aid, broadband and the Government’s disability strategy.

    Asked if the PM had ditched the entire manifesto yesterday, his spokesman insisted: ‘Absolutely not.’








    At Prime Minister’s Questions, Sir Keir Starmer criticised Mr Johnson’s decision to break the promise that under his reforms for England no one would have to sell their home to pay for social care.

    'Chissà se ce la farà alle prossime elezioni, but if he does, come si aspetta che qualcuno prenda sul serio lui e le sue promesse??’ the Labour leader asked.

    Sir Keir accused Mr Johnson of fronting a ‘pickpocketing operation’ to introduce a ‘working-class dementia tax’ because poorer families face losing proportionally more of their assets than wealthier ones.

    At Prime Minister’s Questions, Sir Keir Starmer criticised Mr Johnson’s decision to break the promise that under his reforms for England no one would have to sell their home to pay for social care

    At Prime Minister’s Questions, Sir Keir Starmer criticised Mr Johnson’s decision to break the promise that under his reforms for England no one would have to sell their home to pay for social care

    Durante 2017 election campaign, Theresa May had to backtrack over social care proposals after they were dubbed a ‘dementia tax’ by critics.

    Despite the U-turn, she insisted ‘nothing has changed’.

    Sir Keir said yesterday: ‘It’s just like their 2017 manifesto all over again, only this time something has changed.’

    Mr Johnson defended his record, dicendo che il suo piano di assistenza sociale "fa di più per i lavoratori su e giù per il paese di quanto i laburisti abbiano mai fatto".

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