Britain's first-ever 'green' fireworks night will be held in Dulwich 

Britain’s first-ever ‘green’ fireworks night with virtual bonfire on a big screen and sparklers ban will be held in trendy Dulwich

  • Dulwich Sports Club, south east London, have ditched the bonfire this year
  • Their fireworks night celebration have a virtual fire on a large screen instead
  • Sparklers are also banned from the event, which 7,000 are expected to attend
  • The traditional fireworks night bonfire is being replaced by organisers in Dulwich, who are instead hosting what is thought to be Britain’s first-ever ‘green’ Guy Fawkes celebration.

    The annual event normally sees people gather together around a large bonfire as they admire a series of fireworks being launched into the sky.

    However, organisers at Dulwich Sports Club, in south east London, have shaken things up this year by replacing the bonfire with a virtual screening instead.

    As many as 7,000 people are expected to attend the event, which has also banned sparklers from being brought.

    The traditional fireworks night bonfire is being replaced by organisers in Dulwich, who are instead hosting what is thought to be Britain's first-ever 'green' Guy Fawkes celebration (stock image)

    The traditional fireworks night bonfire is being replaced by organisers in Dulwich, who are instead hosting what is thought to be Britain’s first-ever ‘green’ Guy Fawkes celebration (stock image)

    A description for the event read: ‘This year the event is ‘Going Green’ with an eco-friendly virtual Bonfire on the Big Screen.

    ‘Strictly no sparklers, these will not be allowed on to the site.’

    Speaking about the sports club’s decision to ditch the traditional bonfire, the club’s secretary Susue Giles told The Sun she believes people are more focused on the fireworks on November 5 than the bonfire.

    She added: ‘The decision was made by a separate organising committee, but there are some good reasons behind it.’

    Those who oppose bonfires argue that the the toxic fumes released into the atmosphere are bad for the environment. 

    A description for the event issued online said the event, which is believed to be the first of its kind in Britain, was 'Going Green' with a virtual bonfire - and sparklers have also been banned

    A description for the event issued online said the event, which is believed to be the first of its kind in Britain, was ‘Going Green’ with a virtual bonfire – and sparklers have also been banned

    However, the ‘green’ celebration has not gone down well with all locals, with mother Masie Bennett having told the publication: ‘A fake bonfire is pretty joyless. If we’re just going to watch a flame on a television screen then it’s a bit rubbish and we may as well do that at home.’

    It comes after reports claimed bonfire night could go off without a bang this year after fireworks suppliers warned of steep price increases and potential shortages.

    Industry experts are predicting price rises of up to 50 per cent thanks to a ‘perfect storm’ of problems in getting products to Britain ahead of Guy Fawkes night on November 5.

    The hold-ups were blamed on factory shutdowns in China due to hot weather and public holidays to celebrate the centenary of Communism earlier this year.

    The issue was exacerbated by strong demand in the US for Independence Day celebrations on July 4 and spiking shipping fees due to Covid chaos. The price of a basic catherine wheel is likely to rise from £5.99 to £8.99, while a Stormageddon box of 116 fireworks will sell for £149.99, up from £124.99 last year.

    Industry experts are predicting price rises of up to 50 per cent thanks to a 'perfect storm' of problems in getting products to Britain ahead of Guy Fawkes night on November 5. Pictured: File image of the Yorkshire Balloon Fiesta at York racecourse on August 30

    Industry experts are predicting price rises of up to 50 per cent thanks to a ‘perfect storm’ of problems in getting products to Britain ahead of Guy Fawkes night on November 5. Pictured: File image of the Yorkshire Balloon Fiesta at York racecourse on August 30

    The cost of shipping a container of fireworks from China to Britain has risen to £23,300 from £5,800 last year.

    Steve Raper, chairman of the British Fireworks Association and a consultant for the supplier BrightStar Fireworks, said: ‘It’s a nightmare year. We’ve got a massive shortfall of product, huge shipping costs and we’re expecting a lot of demand.

    ‘Last year, lots of public displays were cancelled in lockdown and people had displays in their gardens, socialising with their neighbours, and loved it.

    ‘This year, a lot of smaller shops will not be able to get stock and people will need to shop earlier to avoid disappointment.’

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