Butterkist leaves bitter taste after parking advert feet from Cenotaph

Butterkist Popcorn leaves bitter taste as marketers park giant billboard advert just feet away from the Cenotaph

  • The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall
  • Twitter users blasted the brand for ‘shamelesslyparking the huge advert there
  • The van had ‘here for the dramaemblazoned on its side for the latest campaign
  • But it stopped in front of the Cenotaph as drivers dished out samples to a crowd
  • Butterkist has been slammed for parking an advertising van in front of the Cenotaph in central 伦敦.

    The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall on Friday morning.

    推特 users blasted the brand for ‘shamelesslyplonking the huge billboard by the iconic war memorial.

    The van was spotted driving through Westminster with the phrase ‘here for the dramaemblazoned on its side as part of a Butterkist advertising blitz.

    But it stopped in front of the Cenotaph as driverswearing theatre-style holdersdished out samples to a small crowd.

    The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall on Friday morning

    The popcorn makers incensed social media viewers after the stunt on Whitehall on Friday morning

    Twitter users blasted the brand for 'shamelessly' plonking the huge billboard by the iconic war memorial. It is pictured driving through Westminster

    Twitter users blasted the brand for ‘shamelesslyplonking the huge billboard by the iconic war memorial. It is pictured driving through Westminster








    The empty tomb for the fallen soldierswhat is the Cenotaph?

    The Cenotaph stands at 50ft and has been on Whitehall since the end of the First World War. It was not designed as the epicentre of a nation’s grief but as a piece of scenery.

    After the conclusion of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, the Allied nations agreed there should be ‘peace parades’. David Lloyd George had been struck by the sight of troops saluting a symbolic catafalque, the platform for a coffin, 在巴黎. He asked for a ‘prominent artistto produce something similar.

    Celebrated architect Edwin Lutyens came up with a ‘cenotaph– from the Greek word for an ’empty tomb– on top of a pillar or ‘pylonthat would serve as a saluting point for the 16,500 servicemen who would march by it. Lutyens’s design was speedily constructed from wood, canvas and plaster and unveiled with such little fuss on the eve of the parade that even he was not invited.

    The following day saw a completely unexpected phenomenon. No sooner had troops marched past than grieving families rushed forward to project their own grief on to it, imagining it might somehow contain the spirit of the fallen.

    They began to lay flowers around the base. In no time, they were 10ft deep. A press account records the heartbreaking words of one boy in the crowd: '哦, 木乃伊, what a lovely garden my Daddy’s got.There were immediate calls for this to become a permanent memorial. Lloyd George needed no persuading.

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    Social media users were left fuming with the stunt and slammed the brand for acting ‘shamelessly’.

    One man posted: ‘I saw you trampling all over the Cenotaph like it is somewhere to hang your coat you shameless p****.

    另一个说: ‘No respect. Doesn’t surprising me one bit though.One woman wrote: 巴雷特最初试图把它当作一个错误来玩,然后显然是在试图引诱那个女人谈话? You need to get this moved.

    Another person put: ‘Imagine thinking this is a good look.’ 作家丽莎麦克杜格尔-佩德森说: ‘Please move the van.

    And one more added: ‘Butterkist popcorn trying to cash in on the drama in Westminster by setting up stall outside Downing Street.

    The Cenotaph stands at 50ft and has been on Whitehall since the end of the First World War.

    It was not designed as the epicentre of a nation’s grief but as a piece of scenery.

    After the conclusion of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, the Allied nations agreed there should be ‘peace parades’.

    David Lloyd George had been struck by the sight of troops saluting a symbolic catafalque, the platform for a coffin, 在巴黎.

    He asked for a ‘prominent artistto produce something similar.

    Celebrated architect Edwin Lutyens came up with a ‘cenotaph– from the Greek word for an ’empty tomb– on top of a pillar or ‘pylonthat would serve as a saluting point for the 16,500 servicemen who would march by it.

    Lutyens’s design was speedily constructed from wood, canvas and plaster and unveiled with such little fuss on the eve of the parade that even he was not invited.

    The following day saw a completely unexpected phenomenon.

    No sooner had troops marched past than grieving families rushed forward to project their own grief on to it, imagining it might somehow contain the spirit of the fallen.

    They began to lay flowers around the base. In no time, they were 10ft deep. A press account records the heartbreaking words of one boy in the crowd: '哦, 木乃伊, what a lovely garden my Daddy’s got.

    Social media users were left fuming with the stunt and slammed the brand for acting 'shamelessly'

    Social media users were left fuming with the stunt and slammed the brand for acting ‘shamelessly

    The Cenotaph stands at 50ft and has been on Whitehall since the end of the First World War. 图为: Huge crowds turned up to see King George V unveil the memorial at 11am on Armistice Day, 1920

    The Cenotaph stands at 50ft and has been on Whitehall since the end of the First World War. 图为: Huge crowds turned up to see King George V unveil the memorial at 11am on Armistice Day, 1920

    There were immediate calls for this to become a permanent memorial. Lloyd George needed no persuading.

    His government commissioned Lutyens to rebuild his empty tomb for eternity in Portland stone.

    He deliberately omitted all religious symbolism.

    More huge crowds turned up to see King George V unveil the memorial at 11am on Armistice Day, 1920.

    It would be followed by the state funeral for the ‘unknown warrior’ 在威斯敏斯特教堂.

    A year later the Royal British Legion came into being and held its first Poppy appealthe pattern set for all national remembrance since.

    Butterkist has been approached for comment.