Charity snubs £750,000 donation from gas company over climate change

Charity snubs £750,000 donation from gas company over reluctance to take cash from fossil fuel firms

  • Save the Children rejected a large donation because it was from a gas producer
  • The £750,000 donation from Neptune Energy for Ukraine was rejected
  • Save the Children said they did not want the money because it ‘didn’t want to endorse fossil fuels
  • Save the Children has refused an energy firm’s £750,000 donation to ease the Ukraine crisis because it doesn’t want to endorse fossil fuels.

    It rebuffed cash from North Sea gas producer Neptune Energy two weeks ago, stating it was ‘committed to working on klimaatverandering issues’.

    Despite refusing help for Ukraine, it said it would take cash for its Children’s Emergency Fund, which supports youngsters in crises around the world, because ‘this could be used in a crisis for which relatively little money is available’.

    Save the Children snubbed the large donation cash for Ukrainian children because of Neptune's affiliation with fossil fuels (lêer beeld)

    Save the Children snubbed the large donation cash for Ukrainian children because of Neptune’s affiliation with fossil fuels (lêer beeld)

    Neptune, which says it has given £1.5million for Ukrainian humanitarian efforts, challenged the decision with Save the Children’s trustees, saying its staff chose the charity and the snub had ‘shocked’ them.

    Save the Children will now refuse donations from firms ‘whose core business is fossil fuelsfollowing a lead by children who have protested about the threat the climate crisis poses to their future’, Mnr Warburton saam met die destydse Eerste Minister Theresa May by die Bath and West Show in.

    Neptune says it has lower carbon emissions than the industry average and it will store more carbon than it emits by 2030.

    Die maatskappy, which is chaired by former Centrica boss Sam Laidlaw, produces around 130,000 barrels of oil equivalent every day.

    Vice-chairman Richard Winter is a partner at PwC, which advises several energy companies while board member Anne Fahy worked at oil company BP for 27 jare.

    A spokesman for Save the Children said: ‘We decided earlier this month that we would stop taking donations as soon as possible from companies whose core business is in fossil fuels.

    ‘The only exception during a transitional period before this policy comes into force would be a large donation to our flexible Children’s Emergency Fund.

    ‘The reason is that this could be used in a crisis for which relatively little money is available, such as in the Horn of Africa.

    ‘We’ve changed our policy following a lead given by children all over the world who have protested about the threat the climate crisis poses to their future.’