Edward Colston statue toppled by BLM protesters is to go into storage

Statue of slave trader Edward Colston which was toppled by BLM protesters in Bristol is being removed from public display and put into storage

  • Statue was rolled into harbour during Black Lives Matter protest in June 2020
  • Bristol City Council workers retrieved it; has been on display in city’s M Shed museum since summer
  • It will be removed from first floor of museum and put into storage on January 3
  • Four people are currently on trial accused of criminal damage in connection with the toppling of the statue, after pleading not guilty
  • The statue of slave trader Edward Colston which was pulled from its plinth by protesters is set to be removed from public display and put into storage.

    The statue was rolled into the harbour during a La vita nera è importante protest in Bristol in June 2020.

    Bristol City Council workers retrieved it and it has been on display in the city’s M Shed museum since this summer.

    But it will be removed from the first floor of the museum and put into storage on January 3.

    The statue of slave trader Edward Colston which was pulled from its plinth by protesters is set to be removed from public display and put into storage. The statue was rolled into the harbour during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol in June 2020 (sopra)

    The statue of slave trader Edward Colston which was pulled from its plinth by protesters is set to be removed from public display and put into storage. The statue was rolled into the harbour during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol in June 2020 (sopra)

    Bristol City Council workers retrieved the statue and it has been on display in the city's M Shed museum (nella foto) since this summer. But it will be removed from the first floor of the museum and put into storage on January 3

    Bristol City Council workers retrieved the statue and it has been on display in the city’s M Shed museum (nella foto) since this summer. But it will be removed from the first floor of the museum and put into storage on January 3

    La statua (sopra) - with spray paint still intact - is lying in front of a window with a view of the harbour. The L Shed contains collections which are no longer on display

    La statua (sopra) – with spray paint still intactis lying in front of a window with a view of the harbour. The L Shed contains collections which are no longer on display

    Four people are currently on trial accused of criminal damage in connection with the toppling of the statue, after pleading not guilty.

    A spokesperson for the museum said: ‘The current Colston statue display will finish on Monday. Please pre-book a time slot if you would like to visit.

    ‘In January, the statue will be moved to our stores in L Shed. You can visit L Shed by booking one of our free behind-the-scenes tours.

    La statua – with spray paint still intactis lying in front of a window with a view of the harbour.

    The L Shed contains collections which are no longer on display.

    Edward Colston: Merchant and slave trader who was once seen as Bristol’s greatest son

    Edward Colston was integral in the Royal African Company, which had complete control of Britain's slave trade

    Edward Colston was integral in the Royal African Company, which had complete control of Britain’s slave trade

    Edward Colston nacque a Bristol da una ricca famiglia di mercanti, 1636.

    Dopo aver lavorato come apprendista presso un'azienda di livrea, ha iniziato a esplorare il settore marittimo e ha avviato un'attività in proprio.

    Successivamente si unì alla Royal African Company e salì di grado fino a vicegovernatore.

    La Compagnia aveva il controllo completo della tratta degli schiavi della Gran Bretagna, così come le sue attività in oro e avorio, con l'Africa e i forti sulla costa dell'Africa occidentale.

    Durante il suo incarico presso la Compagnia le sue navi trasportavano in giro 80,000 schiavi dall'Africa ai Caraibi e in America.

    In giro 20,000 di loro, compreso intorno 3,000 o più figli, morì durante i viaggi.

    Il fratello di Colston, Thomas, fornì le perle di vetro che furono usate per comprare gli schiavi.

    Colston è diventato il deputato conservatore per Bristol in 1710 ma rimase solo per un mandato, per vecchiaia e cattiva salute.

    Ha usato molta della sua ricchezza, maturato dal suo vasto commercio di schiavi, per costruire scuole e ospizi nella sua città natale.

    In suo onore fu eretta una statua e altri edifici a lui intitolati, compreso Colston Hall.

    però, after years of protests by campaigners and boycotts by artists the venue recently agreed to remove all reference of the trader.

    On a statue commemorating Colston in Bristol, a plaque read: ‘Erected by citizens of Bristol as a memorial of one of the most virtuous and wise sons of their city.

    Sulla scia delle proteste di Black Lives Matter 2020 innescato dalla morte di George Floyd negli Stati Uniti, la statua di Colston che domina il porto è stata demolita.

    Annuncio pubblicitario

    How Edward Colston is being erased from Bristol: Name of slave trader is removed from dozens of schools, concert venues and pubs in wake of BLM protests

    By RORY TINGLE for MailOnline

    The name of slave trader Edward Colston has been removed from dozens of schools, concert venues and pubs in Bristol following a Black Lives Matter protest that saw his statue toppled.

    Colston, who served as deputy governor of the Royal African Company, was once celebrated as Bristol’s greatest son and gave several large charitable donations to cement his legacy.

    Colston, who served as deputy governor of the Royal African Company, was once celebrated as Bristol's greatest son, but his legacy is quickly being erased from his home city

    Colston, who served as deputy governor of the Royal African Company, was once celebrated as Bristol’s greatest son, but his legacy is quickly being erased from his home city

    But campaigners have long argued his involvement in the slave trade outweighed his philanthropy, and his name has now been almost completely erased from his home city.

    One of the first to take action in 2018 was Colston Primary School, which renamed itself Cotham Gardens primary school after the majority of parents, pupils and former students agreed to the change.

    These campaigns then came to a head during 2020’s Black Lives Matter protests which saw his statue torn down and thrown into the docks.

    Slide me

    A novembre 2020, Colston’s GirlsSchool became known as Montpelier High School, after a vote by staff and students

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    Colston Hall is now known as the Bristol Beacon, while the former Colston Tower has been renamed Beacon Tower

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    A University of Bristol student housing block once known as Colston Street is now Accommodation at Thirty-Three

    The events led to growing pressure on any Bristol businesses or institutions still honouring Colston in their title.

    The former Colston Hall was re-named ‘Bristol Beacon’ nel mese di settembre 2020 dopo più di 4,000 people participated in a public consultation.

    The management of the charitable music venue said in a post on their website that its former name had ‘acted as a memorial to the slave trader Edward Colston’.

    The post said their long-awaited re-brand was ‘an opportunity for a fresh start and a chance to play our part in creating a fairer and more equal society’.

    A novembre 2020, Colston’s GirlsSchool became known as Montpelier High School, after a vote by staff and students.

    Principal Kerry McCullagh said the new name would ‘allow the school to forge a new identity that represents its diverse and inclusive community’.

    Colston’s School, in Stapleton, is the last to bear his name and is yet to change its name but has announced plans to do so.

    A post on the school’s site said feedback from current pupils, recent former pupils and staff showed that they were ‘inclined to see a change in the name of the school as a positive step’ – and the new name will be announced in 2022.

    Slide me

    A pub formerly known as The Colston Arms was also re-named this month after temporarily adopting the name ‘Ye olde Pubby Mcdrunkface

    Colston Primary School renamed itself Cotham Gardens primary school in 2018, two years before the BLM protests

    Colston Primary School renamed itself Cotham Gardens primary school in 2018, two years before the BLM protests

    Nick Baker, chair of the school’s governors, disse: ‘After a lengthy period of consultation, consideration and reflection, it became clear that those with a closer connection to the school would prefer to have a name that was more relevant for the pupils and staff of today and tomorrow.

    ‘It is hoped that a new identity will do more to reflect the values and ethos that the school stands for today and to make it even more welcoming to the local community it serves.

    A pub formerly known as The Colston Arms was also re-named this month after temporarily adopting the name ‘Ye olde Pubby Mcdrunkface’.

    Colston's School, in Stapleton, is the last to bear his name and is yet to change its name but has announced plans to do so

    Colston’s School, in Stapleton, is the last to bear his name and is yet to change its name but has announced plans to do so

    Colston Road in Easton, Bristol, still bears the slave trader's name, although street signs have been painted over

    Colston Road in Easton, Bristol, still bears the slave trader’s name, although street signs have been painted over

    It is now known as the Open Arms, according to a post on the pub’s Facebook page on December 20.

    Several other bars have made similar moves in recent monthswith others likely to follow.

    A University of Bristol student housing block once known as Colston Street is now Accommodation at Thirty-Three.

    But Colston Street in central Bristol, and Colston Road in Easton, remain as yet unchanged.

    Colston Street in the centre of Bristol is one of the few landmarks to still bear the merchant's name

    Colston Street in the centre of Bristol is one of the few landmarks to still bear the merchant’s name

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