Evan Rachel Wood speaks on Marilyn Manson claims in Phoenix Rising

Evan Rachel Wood expands on claims Marilyn Manson sexually abused her and details activism on behalf of survivors in Phoenix Rising trailer

  • Wood, 34, opens up about past with musician, 53, in two-part doc 
  • Westworld star appeared in front of Congress on behalf of sex assault survivors in 2018 
  • She said, ‘Numerous women heard my story, and knew exactly who it was’ 
  • Wood said she finally had a ‘feeling of being believed’ in speaking with other survivors 
  • The first installment of Phoenix Rising: Don’t Fall airs on HBO March 15 at 9/8c 
  • Evan Rachel Wood opens up about her sexual abuse allegations against Marilyn Manson, and how she’s moving forward as a voice for survivors, in a new trailer for the HBO documentary Phoenix Rising.

    ‘I’m here to talk about Brian Warner, also known to the world as Marilyn Manson,’ Wood, 34, said in the preview for the two-part documentary.

    The doc features interviews with Wood’s relatives, as her mother Sara Lynn Moore, 63, said that Manson ‘studied how to manipulate people’ and groomed Wood, adding, ‘He’s a predator.’








    The latest: Evan Rachel Wood, 34, opens up about her sexual abuse allegations against Marilyn Manson, 53, and how she's moving forward as a voice for survivors, in a new trailer for the HBO documentary Phoenix Rising

    Wood last year emerged publicly with sex assault allegations against the musical artist

    The latest: Evan Rachel Wood, 34, opens up about her sexual abuse allegations against Marilyn Manson, 53, and how she’s moving forward as a voice for survivors, in a new trailer for the HBO documentary Phoenix Rising

    Wood’s brother Ira Wood IV, 37, noted, ‘Everybody was looking at Marilyn Manson and they weren’t looking at Brian Warner.’

    The Westworld star in 2018 appeared in front of Congress in support of the nationwide implementation of the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights Acts, delivering testimony about past sexual abuse she had suffered without naming Manson at the time.

    ‘Numerous women heard my story, and knew exactly who it was,’ said Wood, who would go on to name Manson as her alleged abuser in a 2021 Instagram post.

    The documentary also explores Wood’s efforts with The Phoenix Act, which would see the statute of limitations extended in cases in California involving domestic violence.

    Wood said in the preview for the two-part doc, 'I'm here to talk about Brian Warner, also known to the world as Marilyn Manson'

    Wood said in the preview for the two-part doc, ‘I’m here to talk about Brian Warner, also known to the world as Marilyn Manson’

    The two-part documentary follows Wood's path to activism for sex assault survivors

    The two-part documentary follows Wood’s path to activism for sex assault survivors 








    ‘I became an activist, fighting for victims and survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault,’ Wood said in the preview. ‘Not only did people hear our stories but they said, “Yeah, we hear you, and something does need to change” … we need to make sure this doesn’t happen to anybody else.’ 

    Wood said that amid her revelations and meeting with other survivors of sexual assault, she came to the conclusion that her words were resonating, at long last.

    ‘I realized that this is the first time I haven’t been doubted or questioned or shamed, this is the first time that someone was really listening,’ Wood said in the preview. ‘I was like, “What is this feeling?” And it’s this feeling of being believed.’

    Wood was linked with the 53-year-old musical artist from 2006 until 2011. In the first installment in the documentary, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, she said that the Beautiful People artist had violated her in 2007 during the filming of his music video Heart-Shaped Glasses.

    Wood opened up about how she had kept detailed journals of her life

    Wood opened up about how she had kept detailed journals of her life 

    The Westworld star in 2018 appeared in front of Congress in support of the nationwide implementation of the Sexual Assault Survivors' Bill of Rights Acts, delivering testimony about past sexual abuse she had suffered without naming Manson at the time

    The Westworld star in 2018 appeared in front of Congress in support of the nationwide implementation of the Sexual Assault Survivors’ Bill of Rights Acts, delivering testimony about past sexual abuse she had suffered without naming Manson at the time

    Wood opens up on her focus on behalf of sex assault survivors in the two-part doc

     Wood opens up on her focus on behalf of sex assault survivors in the two-part doc 

    ‘It’s nothing like I thought it was going to be,’ Wood said. ‘We’re doing things that were not what was pitched to me … we had discussed a simulated sex scene, but once the cameras were rolling, he started penetrating me for real. I had never agreed to that. I’m a professional actress, I’ve been doing this my whole life; I’ve never been on a set that unprofessional in my life up until this day.’

    She added: ‘It was complete chaos. I did not feel safe. No one was looking after me. It was a really traumatizing experience filming the video. I didn’t know how to advocate for myself or know how to say no because I had been conditioned and trained to never talk back, to just soldier through.’

    Wood said that in the wake of the video shoot, she had ‘felt disgusting’ and that she had done something shameful, adding, ‘I could tell that the crew was very uncomfortable and nobody knew what to do.’

    Wood said she ‘was coerced into a commercial sex act under false pretenses’ and ‘essentially raped on-camera,’ noting that she was ‘scared’ to expose Manson’s wrongdoings, and that it had taken her a ‘really long time’ to cease blaming herself for what had happened.

    The first installment in the doc premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January

    The first installment in the doc premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January

    Wood said that amid her revelations and meeting with other survivors of sexual assault, she came to the conclusion that her words were resonating, at long last

    Wood said that amid her revelations and meeting with other survivors of sexual assault, she came to the conclusion that her words were resonating, at long last








    Manson’s lawyer Howard King last month issued a statement denying Wood’s accusations about the video shoot.

    ‘Evan was not only fully coherent and engaged during the three-day shoot but also heavily involved in weeks of pre-production planning and days of post-production editing of the final cut. The simulated sex scene took several hours to shoot with multiple takes using different angles and several long breaks in between camera setups.’

    Manson has been accused by at least 15 women of sexual assault, and has denied all claims, saying they are ‘horrible distortions of reality.’

    The first installment of Phoenix Rising: Don’t Fall is set to air on HBO March 15 at 9/8c, with the second installment, Phoenix Rising: Stand Up, slated to air March 16 at 9/8c. The documentary will begin streaming on HBO Max March 15.