Farcical scenes as Rugby Sevens stars wastes two minutes scoring try

Is this the most bizarre rugby try EVER? English star crosses to score but waits over TWO MINUTES before putting the ball down – here’s why the other team let him do it

  •  English Sevens star Will Homer scored a bizarre try against Argentina that wasted over two minutes on the clock at a recent Rugby Sevens tournament
  •  Prominent referee Nigel Owens called the play ‘ungentlemanly conduct’
  •  Twitter users blasted both sides for their part in the farcical scenes
  • English star Will Homer scored one of the most bizarre tries ever seen at the World Rugby Sevens tournament, crossing the tryline but waiting over two minutes to put the ball down in farcical scenes during a pool game between England and Argentina.

    With the score sitting at 19-nil to Argentina – who were already down to six men – Homer broke through the line and ran the length of the field untouched, but decided to wind the clock down instead of planting the ball immediately.

    The Argentinians needed a win to progress to the quarter finals, while England only needed to lose by less than 16 points to make it through.

    Homer’s try meant they would lose by 12 – or 14 with a successful conversion – so he waited until time was almost up before touching the ball down to make sure Los Pumas had no chance to score a try themselves and dump England out of the tournament.  

    English Rugby Sevens star Will Homer wasted over two minutes in scoring a try against Argentina, a play refereeing legend Nigel Owens (inset) said was 'ungentlemanly conduct.'

    English Rugby Sevens star Will Homer wasted over two minutes in scoring a try against Argentina, a play refereeing legend Nigel Owens (inset) said was ‘ungentlemanly conduct.’

    The Pumas seemed content to let him wind down the clock too – if he’d scored too fast there was a chance England could have scored two more quick tries and knocked them out of the next stage. 

    Argentinian players were even called back by their own coach while the mind-boggling situation unfolded in Toulouse, France on May 21.

    Time seemed to stand still as Homer made a line break from the 10-yard line, with the speedy scrum-half allowing a staggering 146 seconds to elapse from when he crossed the line before eventually putting the ball down in England’s 19-7 loss.

    Homer looks toward the England bench as to whether he should continue to waste time before scoring the try.

    Homer looks toward the England bench as to whether he should continue to waste time before scoring the try.

    Fans were quick to blast the situation on social media, though many debated whether it was actually against the Rugby Sevens rules or not. 

    One user referenced the rules, saying:  ‘England should have been penalized. The referee knows better. Law 9.7.d wasting time Law 9.27 against the spirit of good sportsmanship.’

    Others placed as much of the blame at the feet of the Argentineans, saying ‘No law was broken, time wasn’t being wasted if the Argentinians could’ve made an attempt to stop him’.

    The original video of the Tweet has been viewed over 800,000 times, highlighting just how strange the try was. 

    The most authoritative voice on the situation came from Welsh refereeing legend Nigel Owens, who indicated he would not have let the situation unfold if he was the one with the whistle.

    Homer eventually ended up taking over two minutes to put the ball down after going over the tryline.

    Homer eventually ended up taking over two minutes to put the ball down after going over the tryline.

    In an interview with Wales Online, Owens said: ‘Nobody wants to see something like that in the game. The referee has it in his armoury to impose a sanction if he feels an action amounts to ungentlemanly conduct and is against the spirit of the game.

    ‘The England player who broke free against Argentina should have put the ball down without undue delay. Within the laws, the referee is entitled to tell him to put it down and act within the spirit of the game. 

    ‘Had I been officiating and encountered such a situation, I would have sanctioned the player. The onus was on the ball-carrier who’s crossed the tryline to put the ball down.’

    The fact the World Rugby Sevens twitter account called the play ‘unique, bizarre and controversial’ seems to indicate the governing body was not a fan of the play.

    Ironically, both sides met in the fifth place playoff later in the tournament, with Argentina again emerging triumphant, winning 21-12. Fiji won the tournament by beating Ireland 29-17 in the final.