Fauci denies retirement rumors as long as COVID pandemic is in place

Not so fast! Dr Fauci, 81, backtracks on hints that he’s thinking of retiring because ‘we still have a way to go’ before COVID pandemic finally ends

  • Dr Anthony Fauci, 81, said that he isn’t going anywhere as long as the COVID-19 pandemic is around in response to his own hint made 24 hours earlier 
  • ‘I want to make sure we’re really out of this before I really seriously consider doing anything different,’ he said on ABC’s This Week. ‘We’re still in this’
  • On Saturday, Fauci hinted at a possibility to retire soon due to a sharp drop in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the U.S. 
  • Fauci has been the country’s leading public health expert for more than 50 years, serving seven American presidents since Ronald Reagan 
  • He has guided the U.S. through the pandemic as Biden’s top COVID medical adviser while also facing backlash over his handling of the health crisis at times
  • Fauci has always denied accusations of him shutting down inquiries into the virus’ possible origin at a lab in Wuhan that he approved funding for 
  • The head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease said that the pandemic might be over but warned of a possible spike from the BA.2 variant  
  • Dr Anthony Fauci has rowed back on hints that he will soon retire, with 81 year-old saying he thinks the COVID pandemic is still far from over. 

    Speaking a day after he’d said ‘I can’t stay in this job forever,’ Fauci appeared determined to stay when asked on ABC’s This Week if he really was thinking of quitting.

    He answered: ‘I’m not so sure, George,’ the director of the National Health Institute told anchor George Stephonaupolous. ‘I want to make sure we’re really out of this before I really seriously consider doing anything different. We’re still in this.’ 

    ‘We have a way to go. I think we got clearly going in the right direction. I hope we stay that way,’ he added.      

    On Saturday, the second Chief Medical Advisor to the President in U.S. history was questioned over whether the country was finally ready to turn the page from the end of the COVID pandemic and if he intended to get ‘some rest’ once that point in time arrives.  

    Fauci, who also serves as Joe Biden’s medical advisor and as Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease  

    ‘I have said that I would stay in what I’m doing until we get out of the pandemic phase, and I think we might be there already,’ he said. ‘I don’t have any plans right now to go anywhere, but you never know. I can’t stay at this job forever.’ 

    Dr Anthony Fauci addressed comments that he made on on Saturday hinting that he would retire once the COVID-19 pandemic fades away in the U.S., suggesting that the country 'still has a way to go' before that happens

    Dr Anthony Fauci addressed comments that he made on on Saturday hinting that he would retire once the COVID-19 pandemic fades away in the U.S., suggesting that the country ‘still has a way to go’ before that happens

    Fauci has served as public health expert for more than 50 years and has advised every American president since Ronald Reagan, becoming the nation’s top COVID expert while drawing criticism over the nation’s handling of the pandemic.  

    The hints of retirement came as he warned that easing restrictions, the waning protection from vaccines and the rise of the BA.2 subvariant in the UK and around the world could bring on another wave of COVID infections to the U.S. 

    The U.S. recorded about 10,918 new cases over the past day, with about 281 new deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. At the height of the Omicron surge, the US hit an all-time record of well over a million new infections every day. 

    Dr Fauci, who is the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and adviser to President Joe Biden said on Saturday that he might retire soon due to decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the U.S.

    Dr Fauci, who is the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and adviser to President Joe Biden said on Saturday that he might retire soon due to decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the U.S.

    Fauci told ABC that the rise of the new variant, which has seen a spike in the UK, could cause a surge in the U.S. as it appears to be as infectious as Omicron, but added that it would not cause a surge in hospitalizations or deaths. 

    ‘I would not be surprised if in the next few weeks we see somewhat of either a flattening of our diminution or maybe even an increase,’ he said, noting that the U.S. is typically two to three weeks behind the UK when it comes to a spike in cases. 

    Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health was picked to be the White House's lead coronavirus coordinator

    Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health was picked to be the White House’s lead coronavirus coordinator 

    ‘Whether or not that is going to lead to another surge, a mini surge or maybe even a moderate surge, is very unclear because there are a lot of other things that are going on right now.’ 

    He added that the rise could result in COVID restrictions returning to the U.S., but he noted that it would likely be an uphill battle to put the mandates back in place after states all across the country lifted the protocols. 

    ‘From what I know about human nature, which I think is pretty much a lot, people are kind of done with COVID,’ he said. 

    If Fauci steps down, his responsibilities would likely be picked up by Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, who was picked to be the White House’s lead coronavirus coordinator after Jeff Zients steps down next month. 

    The possible retirement comes days after Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul announced he’s introducing an amendment on to boot Fauci out of the job he’s held since 1984, accusing the medical expert of ‘abusing’ his power during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    It’s the latest move in a war of words between the two arch-rivals that’s lasted nearly the entire pandemic since it began in March 2020.

    ‘We’ve learned a lot over the past two years, but one lesson in particular is that no one person should be deemed ‘dictator in chief.’ No one person should have unilateral authority to make decisions for millions of Americans,’ Paul wrote in a Fox News op-ed on Monday.

    ‘To ensure that ineffective, unscientific lockdowns and mandates are never foisted on the American people ever again, I will introduce an amendment to eliminate Dr. Anthony Fauci’s position as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and divide his power into three separate new institutes,’ he added. 

    ‘Each of these three institutes will be led by a director who is appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate for a five-year term,’ Paul explained.  

    ‘This will create accountability and oversight into a taxpayer-funded position that has largely abused its power and has been responsible for many failures and misinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic.’ 

    The COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than 970,000 Americans since it began. 

    Its two years have been marked by partisan battles over health mandates such as lockdowns, vaccine requirements and mask rules.








    Paul, who has been among the loudest critics of broad public health orders, bashed Fauci as an ‘unelected bureaucrat with far too much power.’ 

    ‘No one person should have the sole authority to dictate science, especially when that one person wasn’t ever following the science. I’ve said that from the beginning, and I’ve been proven right over, and over, and over again. On masks, lockdowns, schools, natural immunity, all of it,’ the Kentucky Republican said. 

    He referenced a late November 2021 CBS interview that sparked GOP outrage, during which Fauci said his critics — who are all Republicans — were actually ‘anti-science.’ Fauci also blamed Paul for threats the COVID expert and his family received. 

    Fauci has also been accused of shutting down inquiries into the possibility that the coronavirus originated in a lab in Wuhan, China, following a bombshell report show he in fact did award U.S. tax dollars for gain-of-function research at the Wuhan Institute of Virology.  

    Scott Atlas, a former White House COVID adviser, also criticized Fauci during an interview with Carlson Tucker on Thursday night, questioning whether he should even still be America’s top adviser. 

    ‘When do we admit that the person in charge of the policy is wrong and has been a failure,’ Atlas asked. 

    The criticism extended to the White House, which has been put on edge after a series of positive test results, including Doug Emhoff, Vice President Kamala Harris’ husband who tested positive last week.