George Clarke's Old House, New Home viewers slam 'hideous' extension

‘What a bloody mess!’ George Clarke’s Old House, New Home viewers slam couple for ‘destroying’ their £850,000 Edwardian home with £300,000 ‘bog standard’ extension and enormous terrace

  • Johnny and Laura, from Stratford-Upon Avon, spent £850,000 buying a huge Edwardian property 
  • The couple hoped to spend £250,000 transforming the dingy house into a stunning forever family home
  • Demolished the dodgy ’80s extension and knocked down interior walls to create open plan living area
  • However viewers said they were baffled by the project, with one saying: ‘Look at that hideous extension!’
  • A couple were slammed by George Clarke’s Old House, New Home viewers for ‘destroying’ their £850,000 Edwardian home with a ‘hideous’ £300,000 extension.

    Appearing in last night’s episode of the Channel 4 show, quantity analyst Johnny and his accountant partner Laura, snapped up a £850,000 detached Edwardian home in Straftord-Upon-Avon 14 months ago, which they hoped to transform into their dream family home.

    Packed with original features, the DIY novices said they wanted to bring the property into the 21st century by demolishing the dodgy ’80s extension and reconfiguring the bizarre interior layout downstairs for £250,000. 

    The couple told George they were overjoyed with the renovation, despite confessing they had spent over £50,000 more than their original budget. 

    And viewers confessed they were baffled by the couple’s choices, with one saying: ‘Oh my god. Look at that hideous extension. The architect slags off inappropriate additions then adds one of his own. What a bloody mess.’

    Johnny and his accountant partner Laura, were slammed by George Clarke's Old House, New Home viewers for 'destroying' their £850,000 Edwardian home with a 'hideous' £300,000 extension (pictured, their dining room before)

    Johnny and his accountant partner Laura, were slammed by George Clarke’s Old House, New Home viewers for ‘destroying’ their £850,000 Edwardian home with a ‘hideous’ £300,000 extension (pictured, their dining room before)

    The couple told George they were overjoyed with the renovation, despite confessing they had spent over £50,000 more than their original budget (pictured, the dining room living-space afterwards)

    The couple told George they were overjoyed with the renovation, despite confessing they had spent over £50,000 more than their original budget (pictured, the dining room living-space afterwards) 

    Packed with original features, the DIY novices said they wanted to bring the property into the 21st century by demolishing the dodgy '80s extension and reconfiguring the bizarre interior layout downstairs (pictured, the kitchen before)

    Packed with original features, the DIY novices said they wanted to bring the property into the 21st century by demolishing the dodgy ’80s extension and reconfiguring the bizarre interior layout downstairs (pictured, the kitchen before) 

    During the renovation, the couple demolished the original 80s extension on the property and built their own kitchen-diner in its place

    During the renovation, the couple demolished the original 80s extension on the property and built their own kitchen-diner in its place 

    Another wrote: ‘Edwardian house spoilt by 80s extension. Now trashed by 20s extension.’  

    At the start of the renovation, Laura explained: ‘We hadn’t been looking for a project at all. It was just the perfect location and the right size of house and the right period.

    ‘So, we’ve taken it on. Hopefully we won’t live to regret that.’

    It was a daunting project for the rookie  renovators, but the couple planned to be in the house for the next 30 years.

    They snapped up a £850,000 detached Edwardian home in Stratford-Upon-Avon 14 months ago, which they hoped to transform into their dream family home (pictured, after the renovation)

    They snapped up a £850,000 detached Edwardian home in Stratford-Upon-Avon 14 months ago, which they hoped to transform into their dream family home (pictured, after the renovation) 

    The couple told George they were overjoyed with the renovation, despite confessing they had spent over £50,000 more than their original budget

    The couple told George they were overjoyed with the renovation, despite confessing they had spent over £50,000 more than their original budget 

    Laura said: ‘How can we change it so the house  changes but we keep the period features and we keep the charm?’

    Johnny added: ‘I guess the biggest worry would be if we get the basics wrong.’

    The space was large but just wasn’t working as it currently stood, with a dodgy 80s extension which left the kitchen dark and tunnel like.

    Laura said: ‘The space doesn’t really work for us at the moment, you come in and you walk onto this blank wall.’

    The couple complained that the block extension left by the previous owners left their home with an unusual layout and made the garden feel inaccessible

    The couple complained that the block extension left by the previous owners left their home with an unusual layout and made the garden feel inaccessible 

    However viewers questioned their decision to demolish the original extension simply to add their own modern block in it's place, with some saying it 'destroyed' the character of the property

    However viewers questioned their decision to demolish the original extension simply to add their own modern block in it’s place, with some saying it ‘destroyed’ the character of the property 

    Johnny said he was keen to keep the leaded glass in the house, while Laura said: ‘I really like period properties, all that character that goes with it.’

    George praised the space, but added: ‘It’s the classic thing of the room feeling completely isolated.’ 

    Meanwhile the couple pointed out upside plug-points in the home which had been left by the previous owners.

    George described the kitchen as ‘a long corridor’ and pointed out the ‘half blocked up’ windows.

    Packed with original features, the DIY novices originally said they wanted to bring the property into the 21st century by reconfiguring the bizarre interior layout downstairs for £250,000 (pictured, the front of the house)

    Packed with original features, the DIY novices originally said they wanted to bring the property into the 21st century by reconfiguring the bizarre interior layout downstairs for £250,000 (pictured, the front of the house) 

    Laura and Johnny admitted they felt their spacious hallway was an unused space, which often felt dark and dingy due to the layout of the ground floor

    Laura and Johnny admitted they felt their spacious hallway was an unused space, which often felt dark and dingy due to the layout of the ground floor 

    After the renovation, the couple knocked down interior walls and replaced them with glass bifold doors to bring light into the hallway and open up the ground floor

    After the renovation, the couple knocked down interior walls and replaced them with glass bifold doors to bring light into the hallway and open up the ground floor 

    The couple also had a small utility room, with George saying: ‘It’s just completely wrong on every single level.’   

    They said their budget for the renovation was £250,000, with Laura adding: ‘It’s a lot of money to us! We want to get on with it and get it done while the children are still little, and not forever doing the house.’

    However George considered the budget ‘healthy.’

    He suggested reconfiguring the entirety of the downstairs, suggesting a glazed wall to open up the space.

    Meanwhile they also revealed how the kitchen felt like 'one long corridor' with blocked in windows which left the space dark and dingy (pictured, before)

    Meanwhile they also revealed how the kitchen felt like ‘one long corridor’ with blocked in windows which left the space dark and dingy (pictured, before) 

    Laura and Johnny were quick to demolish their old extension containing their dark kitchen and rebuild it, creating a much larger open-plan living space for the family to enjoy

    Laura and Johnny were quick to demolish their old extension containing their dark kitchen and rebuild it, creating a much larger open-plan living space for the family to enjoy 

    The architect also told the couple they should demolish their extension, saying: ‘You build a new extension on the same line, and in that space we’ve got to get a kitchen, diner and living space.’

    As well as replacing the extension, the couple planned to remove the wall between the dining room and the kitchen.

    They planned to build doors running along the back of the new extension to give the house access to the garden.

    Meanwhile George suggested the family build a large terrace into the garden with an extended outdoor kitchen.

    Upstairs, the family bathroom had been poorly renovated, with a stand alone bath which appeared to have been incorrectly installed (pictured)

    Upstairs, the family bathroom had been poorly renovated, with a stand alone bath which appeared to have been incorrectly installed (pictured) 

    The couple gave the space a fresh lick of paint and trendy new flooring, before adding a free standing bath below the skylight (pictured)

    The couple gave the space a fresh lick of paint and trendy new flooring, before adding a free standing bath below the skylight (pictured) 

    And it wasn’t long before the extension got the chop, while inside, walls were knocked down to open up the space.

    But for a couple who are new to renovating, it was a huge project – and to add tp the pressure the family decided to live on site.

    Laura said: ‘I think we probably underestimated just how much disruption and mess there would be but equally, I think we’re really understanding what’s happening.’

    Meanwhile the couple also created an outdoor kitchen area where Johnny planned to BBQ which they hoped to enjoy as a family  (pictured)

    Meanwhile the couple also created an outdoor kitchen area where Johnny planned to BBQ which they hoped to enjoy as a family  (pictured) 

    George returned to the home to see the huge terrace, saying: ‘The challenge now is how we integrate this enormous terrace with the rest of the garden.’

    He said he wanted to design amphitheater steps to integrate the space with the rest of the garden. 

    Six months into the renovation and the mock-Tudor home was finally being made watertight. 

    But despite the transformation moving forward, the couple were struggling to agree on how to furnish the house.

    And upstairs, the master bedroom was also renovated to restore it to its original grandness, with a huge bed and feature lighting (pictured)

    And upstairs, the master bedroom was also renovated to restore it to its original grandness, with a huge bed and feature lighting (pictured) 

    Laura said: ‘Johnny would turn it into an old people’s home, with chairs dotted around the outside.’

    After 12 months, George returned to see the property and confessed he was blown away by the couple’s efforts to transform their home.

    Laura said: ‘Having this as a family space, it’s just transformed. It’s worked, it has worked. We did everything you drew and I hope we did your drawings justice.’

    George said: ‘For me, it’s like an extension of the house.’

    And when George questioned them on the budget, they said: ‘We spent more than that, definitely. We’re on the other side of £300,000. But we’ve done everything and much more with it, and we’ve done everything we need to do. 

    However despite the couple's enthusiasm for their new home, many of those watching were left baffled by their choices and said the Edwardian property had been 'trashed'

    However despite the couple’s enthusiasm for their new home, many of those watching were left baffled by their choices and said the Edwardian property had been ‘trashed’

    ‘We didn’t want to take shortcuts. We wanted to do things to do the house justice.’

    Johnny added: ‘If you’re going to do it, you’re going to do it once.’ 

    However despite the couple’s enthusiasm for their new home, many of those watching were left baffled by their choices.

    One commented: ‘As I said, they’re losing a huge chunk of garden. Only then does the architect think about how garden and terrace are integrated. At the expense of a bit more garden.’

    ‘That new extension destroys a beautifully proportioned Edwardian house,’ another added.

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