Home to withstand floods features on Grand Designs: Casa dell'anno

A modernist riverside home designed to withstand extreme floods, a minimalist camouflage house and a Japanese-inspired building built on £200,000 budget compete for Grand Designs: Casa dell'anno

  • Latest houses on RIBA’s House of the Year shortlist to be showcased have a theme of problem-solving homes
  • Kevin McCloud, architect Damion Burrows and design expert Michelle Ogundehin, toured the homes
  • The presenters visited renovated contemporary barn as well as a house built to withstand extreme floods
  • The third episode of Grand Designs: House of the Year airs tonight on Channel 4 alle 21:00
  • A modernist riverside home designed to withstand extreme flooding, a pared-back barn conversion and a Japanese-inspired building are among the properties competing in the latest heat to be named Grand Designs: Casa dell'anno.

    In the third programme of the series, airing tonight on Canale 4, Kevin McCloud and his co-presenters, architect Damion Burrows, and design expert Michelle Ogundehin, visit five homes across the UK battling it out for a place on the shortlist, all of which push the boundaries in conventional design.

    Each of the buildings was designed to solve a problemsfrom a house that deploys discreet camouflage to blend in to its overlooked setting to a modular timber home that elegantly resolves the challenges of building in a remote, unforgiving Highland environment.

    Meanwhile the show also features a sleek riverside house; a barn conversion that neatly sidesteps the pitfalls of restoring agricultural buildings; and a Japanese-inspired house in Cambridge that proves a standard budget needn’t be an obstacle to building a bespoke home.

    Kevin explained: ‘In tonight’s episode, we’re looking at houses that solve problems. Think of them as champion chess players, experts in masters of strategy, able to overcome obstacles with every turn with brilliant ideas.

    ‘Whether it’s with a single stroke of genius or hours and hours of painstaking trial and error. These buildings have all taken on a challenge and not just risen to it, but transcended it.

    Qui, a closer look at the five homes

    A modernist riverside home designed to withstand extreme flooding (nella foto), a pared-back barn conversion and a Japanese-inspired building are among the properties competing in the latest heat to be named Grand Designs: Casa dell'anno

    A modernist riverside home designed to withstand extreme flooding (nella foto), a pared-back barn conversion and a Japanese-inspired building are among the properties competing in the latest heat to be named Grand Designs: Casa dell'anno

    In the third programme of the series, in onda stasera su Canale 4 , Kevin McCloud and his co-presenters, architect Damion Burrows, and design expert Michelle Ogundehin, visit five homes across the UK battling it out for a place on the shortlist, all of which push the boundaries in conventional design (nella foto, a house in the North-West of Scotland)

    In the third programme of the series, in onda stasera su Canale 4 , Kevin McCloud and his co-presenters, architect Damion Burrows, and design expert Michelle Ogundehin, visit five homes across the UK battling it out for a place on the shortlist, all of which push the boundaries in conventional design (nella foto, a house in the North-West of Scotland)

    Each of the buildings was designed to solve a problems - including a house that deploys discreet camouflage to blend in to its overlooked setting (nella foto)

    Each of the buildings was designed to solve a problemsincluding a house that deploys discreet camouflage to blend in to its overlooked setting (nella foto)

    Meanwhile the programme also features a Japanese-inspired house in Cambridge that proves a standard budget needn¿t be an obstacle to building a bespoke home

    Meanwhile the programme also features a Japanese-inspired house in Cambridge that proves a standard budget needn’t be an obstacle to building a bespoke home

    MODERNIST RIVERSIDE HOME

    Visiting the first home featured on the programme, Kevin explained: ‘Living by the river is a dream for many of us. Sitting back on the porch in the sunshine and soaking up the cooling breeze, watching swans drift by on the meandering current, observing the pleasure craft.

    'In verità, the reality can be much more brutal, especially when the weather is back. The rain sloshes down, the river bursts its banks and you find your house flooded. It’s quite the set of problems isn’t it.

    River House, by John Pardey, was built on a flood plain of the River Loden in Berkshire. It’s long and tall, lifted above the river bank on two metre stilts, with a svelte angular interior.

    It’s a glamorous, glorious place to while away the hours, and stretches a whopping 50 metres end to end.

    There are three bedrooms, two studies, a terrace, and a large open plan living space.

    It’s home to Tony, a semi-retired consultant surgeon, e Charlotte, who worked in the art world, who both dreamed of retiring to the river bank.

    River House, by John Pardey, was built on a flood plain of the River Loden in Berkshire. It's long and tall, lifted above the river bank on two metre stilts, with a svelte angular interior

    River House, by John Pardey, was built on a flood plain of the River Loden in Berkshire. It’s long and tall, lifted above the river bank on two metre stilts, with a svelte angular interior

    It's a glamorous, glorious place to while away the hours, and stretches a whopping 50 metres end to end (nella foto)

    It’s a glamorous, glorious place to while away the hours, and stretches a whopping 50 metres end to end (nella foto)

    Speaking of the extreme flooding, Charlotte said: 'È davvero emozionante, garden furniture gets tied to the tree and everything else goes in the garage. You cannot have anything under the house.

    The couple said it was a way of staying minimalist, aggiungendo: ‘And you can’t plant anything, so gardening is a breeze really.

    Tony said: ‘You don’t realise about flooding until you live in it, it’s not like having a swimming pool at the bottom of the stairs. It’s actually fast flowing, aggressive water.

    ‘If you come downstairs into the flood, you really have to be very careful not to lose your footing, or you’ll get swept away.

    The RIBA judges praised Tony and Charlotte for their hands on approach with the build, having spotted the couple's personal touch in the morning terrace they requested at the end and the interior detailing (nella foto)

    The RIBA judges praised Tony and Charlotte for their hands on approach with the build, having spotted the couple’s personal touch in the morning terrace they requested at the end and the interior detailing (nella foto)

    They said it was a ‘younger person house’, with Kevin adding: ‘It is a pratical home for later life. It’s effortlessly elegant, with steel lined columns lifting the home above the flood level without breaking a sweat.

    ‘Even the cladding seems to hang on without screws.

    The home was inspired by 20th century modernist pavilions which had huge glass walls to let the landscape in.

    The real viewing experience was outside, con un 50 foot window showcasing the stunning view of the river.

    The RIBA judges praised Tony and Charlotte for their hands on approach with the build, having spotted the couple’s personal touch in the morning terrace they requested at the end and the interior detailing.

    But it’s not just the joinery which carries you through the house, the lighting carries you through the building to take you to the master bedroom at the far end.

    As every good modernist building does, it separates private and public rooms.

    RUGGED BUILDING IN SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS

    The second problem-solving longlister defied the challenges of building in the middle of nowhere, with Damian travelling to the North-West coast of Scotland to find it

    The second problem-solving longlister defied the challenges of building in the middle of nowhere, with Damian travelling to the North-West coast of Scotland to find it

    Accessed only by an 8 mile long single track road, House in Assynt had to be built off site and transported in miniscule sections (nella foto, il soggiorno)

    Accessed only by an 8 mile long single track road, House in Assynt had to be built off site and transported in miniscule sections (nella foto, il soggiorno)

    The front pod is an open plan living space, while the second pod has a master bedroom with an en-suite and the final pod has an additional bathroom and guestroom (nella foto, the master bedroom)

    The front pod is an open plan living space, while the second pod has a master bedroom with an en-suite and the final pod has an additional bathroom and guestroom (nella foto, the master bedroom)

    The second problem-solving longlister defied the challenges of building in the middle of nowhere, with Damian travelling to the North-West coast of Scotland to find it.

    Accessed only by an 8 mile long single track road, House in Assynt had to be built off site and transported in miniscule sections.

    The house is beautifully striking, with a breathtaking interior. It was built as three modules, each with a different function.

    The front pod is an open plan living space, while the second pod has a master bedroom with an en-suite and the final pod has an additional bathroom and guestroom.

    The owners are Phil and Heather, who discovered the area while holidaying in 2015 and fell in love with it (nella foto)

    The owners are Phil and Heather, who discovered the area while holidaying in 2015 and fell in love with it (nella foto)

    The owners are Phil and Heather, who discovered the area while holidaying in 2015 and fell in love with it.

    Phil said: ‘I’ve always had a hankering to have a place somewhere in the middle of nowhere. And this is the middle of nowhere.

    Heather said: ‘There’s definitely none of the attractions of an urban centre.

    Phil continued: ‘A lot of people might say, “Why would you do this?” and the answer is, we just love this wilderness.

    ‘We had no idea what we wanted, we knew we wanted to do something that felt right with the terrain.

    To save time on site, the house was built in a factory 70 miglia di distanza in 13 sections before it was transported to the site where it was assembled in just four days

    To save time on site, the house was built in a factory 70 miglia di distanza in 13 sections before it was transported to the site where it was assembled in just four days

    The builders battled lashing wind and rain to assemble the home in just four days, with the end result being a remarkably efficient building that now conserves energy (nella foto)

    The builders battled lashing wind and rain to assemble the home in just four days, with the end result being a remarkably efficient building that now conserves energy (nella foto)

    Heather added; ‘When we met Mary our architect, the first thing she said was it’s going to be a light touch house.

    Phil said: ‘She did have a vision very early on of what could be built, and she turned us onto it. When we came to the see the plot, we met Mary the first day, and she leant down and smelt the ground.

    Meanwhile Mary said: ‘Who am I to break ancient rocks? I’m only here for a while. let’s make a point not to do it. I made a point to fit the building between two headlands without breaking rocks.

    She built the home on stilts, perched on a barely there concrete strip.

    It’s a place to destressbut the process of the build was anything but relaxing.

    To save time on site, the house was built in a factory 70 miglia di distanza in 13 sections. The problem lay in getting the sections to site.

    Each module was transported by one driver up a single track road.

    Heather said: ‘We saw the first load arriving and we couldn’t quite believe he’d managed to do it.

    The builders battled lashing wind and rain to assemble the home in just four days, with the end result being a remarkably efficient building that now conserves energy.

    Even the need for artificial light has been minimalized, where there are floor to ceiling sliding doors and plenty of glass.

    MINAMALIST CAMOUFLAUGE HOUSE

    The third-build on the programme was in Hove, surrounded on all sides by overlooking neighbours but cleverly tucked away.

    The clever 5,000 sq ft building camouflaged itself with a green roof and a black brick cloak.

    It was built by a property developer Paul and his wife Maria, with Paul confessing: ‘I considered pursuing architecture as a profession but discovered quite early on that I neither had the talent or patience to go and qualify.

    The third-build on the programme was in Hove, surrounded on all sides by overlooking neighbours but cleverly tucked away from view (nella foto)

    The third-build on the programme was in Hove, surrounded on all sides by overlooking neighbours but cleverly tucked away from view (nella foto)

    The property has a cunning layout, with the bedrooms in a quiet bedroom to the front, while the kitchen diner and master bedroom wrap around a cool courtyard featuring a pool in the centre (nella foto, the living space)

    The property has a cunning layout, with the bedrooms in a quiet bedroom to the front, while the kitchen diner and master bedroom wrap around a cool courtyard featuring a pool in the centre (nella foto, the living space)

    ‘The next best thing was commissioning the architecture.

    Maria added: ‘I think I don’t have the same passion for architecture that Paul has.

    The property has a cunning layout, with the bedrooms in a quiet bedroom to the front, while the kitchen diner and master bedroom wrap around a cool courtyard featuring a pool in the centre.

    Kevin was wowed by the design of the home, aggiungendo: ‘It’s an amazing spot.

    Ha detto Paul: ‘We’re very mindful of our neighbours and we wanted to make sure it wasn’t an imposition. I love houses to be monasticthat sense of stillness, tranquility. It’s good for the soul.

    The RIBA judges loved the seamless flow between the interior and exterior spaces (nella foto, the mininalist interiors of the home)

    The RIBA judges loved the seamless flow between the interior and exterior spaces (nella foto, the mininalist interiors of the home)

    The RIBA judges loved the seamless flow between the interior and exterior spaces.

    The kitchen was monastically minimal and perfectly white with a simple polished floor.

    To build the remarkable home took 15 mesi, with Paul explaining: ‘As I’m told by the contractors, it was two of the wettest winters on record, and we’re on clay where we are here. At first on the site, where one of our workers got trench foot.

    The visionary behind the house was the architect Paul Turner, chi ha detto: ‘Paul had bought this site because he’s a developer and the penny dropped that this could be a perfect forever home for them.

    ‘When it flipped from being a developer into his own house, he started putting more money into it because if it’s for yourself then you can see the value in having that extra thing you want.

    ANCIENT CRUMBLING FARM BUILDING

    The next property on the longlist saw Michelle travel to deepest Devon to visit The Outfarm, a barn conversion like no other (nella foto)

    The next property on the longlist saw Michelle travel to deepest Devon to visit The Outfarm, a barn conversion like no other (nella foto)

    The next property on the longlist saw Michelle travel to deepest Devon to visit The Outfarm, a barn conversion like no other.

    It keeps the original openings of the building where cattle would go in and out, but inside it has the interiors of a private member’s club.

    It is home to Richard and Dawn, who fell for its romantic charm eight years ago.

    Richard ha detto: ‘When we first saw it, we had just glimpsed it through the fog across the fields and it was just this sort of fairytale feel to it. We were quite enchanted, the spirit of the place just got us straight away.

    Dawn said: ‘It’s very castle like.

    Luckily for them, they had a son Tom who could turn their dream into a reality.

    It is home to Richard and Dawn, who fell for its romantic charm eight years ago. Their son Tom designed the perfect home for the couple (nella foto, the large upstairs room)

    It is home to Richard and Dawn, who fell for its romantic charm eight years ago. Their son Tom designed the perfect home for the couple (nella foto, the large upstairs room)

    Lui ha spiegato: ‘I think a decent bit of architecture is disciplined and restrained. It’s about honesty and expression. To create a home for people you know so well was a joy to do.

    Michelle said: ‘From this side you get an idea of the majesty of this barn.

    But when the couple first bought the home, it was far from a habitable buildingthere was no roof and no floor, with trees growing up inside the ruin.

    Richard ha detto: ‘The walls were so solid and it had this feeling of longevity. within a few years it would have been beyond it and the wall would seriously start falling down.

    Dawn said: ‘I just thought it had such an incredible feel and I felt so sure that it needed rescuing.

    The layout remains true to the original design, downstairs, where cattle once lived, are a kitchen, two bedrooms and a bathroom.

    Meanwhile upstairs, there was now a central core with a long open space unbroken from interior walls.

    Michelle called it ‘almost churchlike’, while Richard said: ‘We wanted to retain that barn-like feeling to it.

    Infatti, the RIBA judges praised the fact that every new addition to the barn built on the old history.

    Richard lived on site in a yurt, while Dawn continued working 200 lontano miglia.

    Dawn said: ‘I used to come every Thursday and see how they were progressing, I couldn’t contribute very much but it was very exciting when I got here.

    Richard ha detto: ‘When it was pouring with rain and so much mud, it could get a bit tetchy. But we had enough passion to just get through and get on.

    Dawn said: ‘If you worked really hard for something, it means so much more. It’s fantastic sense of achievement.

    £200,000 JAPANESE INSPIRED HOME

    The final longlister solves the problem of building a stunning house on a budget, with Damian visiting Simple House on a former council estate in Cambridge.

    Made to measure for its owners, the simple yet elegant living spaces tailored for their needs spilled off a central wall.

    The final longlister solves the problem of building a stunning house on a budget, with Damian visiting Simple House on a former council estate in Cambridge

    The final longlister solves the problem of building a stunning house on a budget, with Damian visiting Simple House on a former council estate in Cambridge

    From the gravel embedded in the concrete floor to the striking roof lights, the home was all built for £200,000.

    Simple House makes the most of a modest plot, taking inspiration from Japanese-houses, with two courtyards.

    It has several bedrooms and a study.

    It’s owners are Jenny, who works in the theatre, and Aki, who grew up in Japan.

    They decided to build simple house after they struggled to find something to afford in budget in the city.

    Akai said: ‘Houses were out of the question, nothing with a garden, nothing detached. We were also at the same time looking for a plot of land. We looked for about three years and came up finally.

    The owners decided to build a simple house after they struggled to find something to afford in budget in the city (nella foto, the interior of the home)

    The owners decided to build a simple house after they struggled to find something to afford in budget in the city (nella foto, the interior of the home)

    Jenny added: ‘I was really excited about the idea of starting from scratch and fitting everything to your size.

    ‘It’s a small plot but we’re two quite small people and we could make everything fit around us, and that was quite a wonderful prospect.

    The build quietly nods to Akai’s Japanese heritage, with Jenny saying: ‘We didn’t want to make a loud statement about Japanese design, but we appreciated that kind of detailing and subtly that is in the design.

    ‘There wasn’t a lot of finishing on the interior it was just built and left like that.

    It”s ultra efficient and doesn’t waste a minimetre of the plot.

    Building Simple House was less than simply, because it was built on loose clay soil. But despite a difficult build, it was finished in 13 months and proves experience materials and fancy gadgets are nowhere near essential in the creation of a one-off home.

    I commenti sono chiusi.