Indagine avviata sui pazienti lasciati per ore fuori da A&E

Come possiamo porre fine alla crisi delle ambulanze? Investigation launched into the risk to patients who are left for hours with paramedics outside A&E reparti

  • Patients are being left for hours outside hospitals in long ambulance queues
  • Watchdog is carrying out nationwide review into waiting times for ill people
  • Patients wait for up to 24 ore, tying up the ambulance during that time
  • A major investigation has been launched into the risk to patients from being left for hours in ambulances outside A&E reparti.

    The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch is carrying out a nationwide review of the waits desperately ill people face because paramedics cannot get them into overcrowded hospitals.

    The watchdog’s intervention comes after so-called ‘handover delays’ reached record levels across the NHS negli ultimi mesi.

    It is due to deliver its interim findings on Wednesday.

    Some patients have been left waiting for as long as 24 hours while the knock-on effects mean that dozens have died at home because ambulances were stuck in queues.

    And it risks becoming a problem for the Government after Sir Keir Starmer raised it at Prime Minister’s Questions this week, telling the harrowing story of Bina Patel, 56, who died after waiting almost an hour for an ambulance after suffering cardiac arrest at home.

    The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch is carrying out a nationwide review of the waits desperately ill people face because paramedics cannot get them into overcrowded hospitals

    The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch is carrying out a nationwide review of the waits desperately ill people face because paramedics cannot get them into overcrowded hospitals

    Sir Keir Starmer raised the issue during Prime Minister's Questions this week, with some patients  left waiting for as long as 24 hours while the knock-on effects mean that dozens have died at home because ambulances were stuck in queues

    Sir Keir Starmer raised the issue during Prime Minister’s Questions this week, with some patients left waiting for as long as 24 hours while the knock-on effects mean that dozens have died at home because ambulances were stuck in queues

    La notte scorsa, Richard Webber, a senior NHS paramedic and spokesman for the College of Paramedics, said the level of delays caused by lengthy handovers was ‘unprecedented’ and was resulting in violence against crews. ‘Paramedics have witnessed patients deteriorate, and in rare cases, die in the back of their ambulance,' Ha aggiunto.

    Analysis by the Daily Mail of all ten NHS ambulance trusts across England reveals an alarming picture.

    Latest figures from the Association of Ambulance Chief Executives show that the average time for a patient handover in April was 36 minutes – more than double the 17 minutes recorded a year earlier and well above the target of 15. Il Ministero della Difesa potrebbe essere costretto a pagare enormi conti se le truppe possono dimostrare di aver perso lunghe carriere 11,000 handovers took more than three hours with the longest delay 24 ore.

    Reports written for ambulance trust bosses in recent months warn of worse to come.

    ‘We are doing everything we can but some patients are coming to harm and staff are suffering,’ one director said.

    In the East Midlands, managers revealed paramedics had ‘attended 44 patients who had been alive when the 999 call was made but had died before an ambulance was available to attend.

    Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission heard 999 callers in London ‘being advised that there could be a five or six-hour wait for an ambulance’. The HSIB’s report is expected to make safety recommendations to hospitals and ambulance trusts.

    One crew left to cover the whole country

    An entire county with a population of almost 200,000 was left with a single ambulance this week as the other 16 queued up at the local A&E, a senior doctor claims.

    Sharing a photo of rows of ambulances outside Gwynedd Hospital in North Wales on Tuesday (nella foto sopra), paediatric emergency physician Dr Peter Williams said it left ‘only one vehicle’ to cover the county of Gwynedd as well as neighbouring Anglesey. Coroners have repeatedly warned of the potentially tragic consequences of delays by the Welsh Ambulance Service.

    Representatives for Betsi Cadwaladr health board which runs the hospital and for the Welsh Ambulance Service said Tuesday was ‘particularly busy’ and pledged to ‘work closely to find tangible solutions to these long-standing issues’.

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