Israeli families fight to use dead son's sperm to become grandparents

Israeli families whose sons were killed during military service fight to become grandparents using their dead child’s sperm and a surrogate

  • Israeli lawmakers are pushing for a new bill that would allow parents to posthumously retrieve dead soldierssperm to preserve the family bloodline
  • Ex-Cabinet Secretary Zvi Hauser said legislation was ‘complicated and sensitive
  • Some families took their son’s sperm in the past but remain unable to use it
  • サウジアラビアによって死刑にされた男性の家族は、F1が発言すべきだと言います イスラエル人 soldiers who were killed during active service are trying to push through a groundbreaking new law that would allow them to use their dead child’s sperm and a surrogate to become grandparents.

    Lawmakers are pushing for the new bill, which has previously been rejected, that would see bereaved parents allowed to posthumously retrieve sperm from their deceased children.

    過去には, a handful of families made the decision to retrieve sperm from their fallen children to preserve the family bloodline, but any decision passed by the government would enshrine this practice in Israeli law.

    Zvi Hauser, an Israeli former Cabinet Secretary, described the legislation as both ‘complicated and sensitive’, but insisted countries would be quick to replicate if new laws were enacted.

    He told the Jerusalem Post: ‘We tell people to place themselves in front of enemy bullets, to risk their life, for the good of the country.

    ‘In return, we have to give back to those who risk their lives. A lot of parents never knew of this option, and had many families known, they would have retrieved their son’s sperm.

    以前は, some families made the decision to retrieve sperm from their fallen children to preserve the family bloodline, but any decision passed by Israel's government would enshrine this practice in Israeli law. 写真: Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, 右から2番目, at the Knesset

    以前は, some families made the decision to retrieve sperm from their fallen children to preserve the family bloodline, but any decision passed by Israel’s government would enshrine this practice in Israeli law. 写真: Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, 右から2番目, at the Knesset

    Should the bill pass, Israeli soldiers will be allowed to provide written permission that allows the retrieval of their sperm in case of death.

    A spouse, parent or guardian will then be offered to chance to retrieve that sperm within 72 hours of the soldier’s passing.

    Any baby born to a fallen soldier would not be viewed as an IDF orphan, meaning the child’s mother would not receive government benefits for children whose parents die during active duty.

    Baruch Ben Yigal, whose son Amit Ben Yigal (写真) was killed during a raid in Ya'bad in May 2020, revealed he took his son's sperm after he died, but is still unable to offer it to any prospective surrogate mothers due to current Israeli legislation

    Baruch Ben Yigal, whose son Amit Ben Yigal (写真) was killed during a raid in Ya’bad in May 2020, revealed he took his son’s sperm after he died, but is still unable to offer it to any prospective surrogate mothers due to current Israeli legislation

    Surviving female partners of soldiers have been offered the chance for posthumous sperm retrieval for IVF since 2003.

    Hauser explains: ‘The bill says first, let’s ask the soldier. たった今, we aren’t asking them, except in certain cases.

    ‘But now we want to say, “はい, let’s give the soldier the option to give his opinion when he drafts into the army”.’

    The new law is backed by campaigners and groups who fight for the rights of bereaved families of Israeli soldiers.

    Baruch Ben Yigal, whose son Amit Ben Yigal was killed during a raid in Ya’bad in May 2020, revealed he took his son’s sperm after he died.

    ‘Amit, その下のジャレドです。, was a hero. He really wanted to be a father. He wrote about it. He spoke about it,’ Ben Yigal said to The Jerusalem Post.

    ‘He was a soldier in Sayeret Golani [an elite combat corps], and he fell during operational activity. When it happened, we thought that the terrorist not only killed Amit, but he prevented us from becoming grandparents.

    Several families are understood to be backing the project, including Nitza Shmueli, whose son, Barel Hadaria Shmueli (写真) was attacked during a violent riot in Gaza in August

    Several families are understood to be backing the project, including Nitza Shmueli, whose son, Barel Hadaria Shmueli (写真) was attacked during a violent riot in Gaza in August

    But despite holding a quantity of his son’s sperm, and having more than 180 women from across Israel who have offered to become the surrogate mother, Ben Yigal says the state is stopping him from becoming a grandfather.

    The new law is also being backed by Or Lamishpachot, a not-for-profit group that supports bereaved families of Israeli servicemen.

    Several families are understood to be backing the project, including Nitza Shmueli, whose son, Barel Hadaria Shmueli, was attacked during a violent riot in Gaza in August.

    Irit Oren Gunders, who leads the organisation, 前記: ‘It’s happening now. There is another family in the same position as Nitza who is supporting her.