Met Police officers should 'not be judged by the attitudes of today'

Met Police officers who exchanged racist, homophobic and sexist messages were ‘trying to amuse each otherand should ‘not be judged by the attitudes of today’, 재판소 청문회

  • PCs Sukhdev Jeer and Paul Hefford and ex-officer Richard Hammond accused
  • Lawyers representing three officers accepted actions amounted to misconduct
  • All three officers deny that their behaviour amounts to gross misconduct
  • Metropolitan Police officers who exchanged racist, homophobic and sexist messages were ‘trying to amuse each otherand should ‘not be judged by the attitudes of today’, 재판소는 들었다.

    PC Sukhdev Jeeralong with PC Paul Hefford and former officer Richard Hammondare accused of sharing racist and offensive messages in a WhatsApp group, including a comparison between 메건 마클 and a golliwog.

    They also failed to challenge or report the other members of the chat after receiving the offensive posts, 주장된다.

    Vishal Misra, 에 대한 Met Police, has told the misconduct hearing in Fulham that PC Jeer, 47, contributed to the group the most, followed by PC Hefford, 37, and then Hammond, 36.

    The trio were all part of a unit at Bethnal Green Police Station and were members of a WhatsApp group called ‘But They Promised’ that was active between January and December 2018.

    Mr Misra earlier told the hearing: ‘All of the content in the log is submitted to be explicitly racist, 동성애 혐오, 성차별주의자, ableist and islamaphobic.’

    그는 덧붙였다: ‘All of the respondents failed to challenge one another with regards to the content being posted.’

    The panel has heard that PC Jeer posted an image of a young boy in a hoodie captioned as a ‘monkey in the jungle’.

    Hammond is said to have sent a ‘discriminatory message’ about the London borough of Tower Hamlets.

    ‘In explaining the message, former PC Hammond in effect said that people from the Bangladeshi community seem to accept election fraud as part of their democratic processes,’ Mr Misra said.

    PC Sukhdev Jeer outside a Met Disciplinary hearing on Tuesday into a number of WhatsApp messages he sent

    PC Sukhdev Jeer outside a Met Disciplinary hearing on Tuesday into a number of WhatsApp messages he sent

    Serving Met Police officer PC Paul Hefford is accused of sharing inappropriate messages

    Serving Met Police officer PC Paul Hefford is accused of sharing inappropriate messages

    Former Met officer Richard Hammond was in a WhatsApp chat called 'But They Promised'. He  is said to have sent a 'discriminatory message' about the London borough of Tower Hamlets.

    Former Met officer Richard Hammond was in a WhatsApp chat called ‘But They Promised’. He is said to have sent a ‘discriminatory messageabout the London borough of Tower Hamlets.

    The trio were all part of a unit at Bethnal Green Police Station and were members of a WhatsApp group called 'But They Promised' that was active during 2018

    The trio were all part of a unit at Bethnal Green Police Station and were members of a WhatsApp group called ‘But They Promisedthat was active during 2018

    One meme said: ‘We asked a hundred normal people, “What do you associate with Islam?” 1. Terrorism 2. Pedofilia 3. Hate Preaching 4. Unwelcome invaders 5. Excessive breeders 6. Goat/Camel f***ers.’

    The worst WhatsApp messages from the ‘But They Promisedgroup chat at the heart of the misconduct tribunal

    An image showing a nun on the left and a woman wearing a Muslim headscarf on the right. The image is captioned: ‘Why is the first one not judged but the second one offends?’ 한 개의 댓글을 읽었습니다.: ‘Nuns don’t randomly explode.

    Another meme showed two black men lying next to two white women. It was captioned: ‘Girlstrip to Jamaica. One came back pregnant, the other came back with syphilis. (Just kidding, they’re both still missing.)’

    Another was of the message: ‘Everyone is so politically correct these days. You can’t even say, ‘Black paint,’ you have to say, ‘Tyrone can you plea paint that wall?”

    A clip was from the movie Jurassic Park and plays the film’s theme tune and to footage of a man with disabilities is walking out of a building with the assistance of his carer.

    Another said ‘We asked a hundred normal people, ‘What do you associate with Islam?’ 1. Terrorism 2. Pedofilia 3. Hate Preaching 4. Unwelcome invaders 5. Excessive breeders 6. Goat/Camel f******.

    A picture of a young boy in a hoodie was captioned ‘monkey in the jungle’.

    One meme showed the image of a ‘Golliwogtoy that was captioned: ‘A sneak preview at Meghan’s wedding dress.

    A clip showed a white woman stating that if you want to get good exercise in effect they will arrange for a black man to chase her around so that she can get exercise.

    Message to the effect that people from the Bangladeshi community seem to accept election fraud as part of their democratic processes.

    One message was a reply to a female colleague who had texted saying three boys had threatened to throw acid on her. She had added, ‘2xIC1 and 3xIC3’, which the tribunal heard meant two white boys and one black boy. Mr Hammond replied: ‘Black kid leading those poor white kids astray.

    Another video showed somebody who suffers from dwarfism jumping into a body of water with sound effects designed to mock.

    광고

    Another meme showed an image of a ‘Golliwog’ toy that was captioned: ‘A sneak preview at Meghan’s wedding dress.’

    Giving evidence PC Jeer said he did not find this funny even at the time.

    ‘The fact that someone is out there can create this, that is not a nice thing to do but I posted this on the group not to laugh at it but [to show] that there are people out there who still do this and find it funny.’

    Lawyers representing the three officers accepted their actions amounted to misconduct but not ‘gross’ misconduct warranting dismissal.

    Michael Shaw, for Pc Hefford, said his behaviour should not be judged by the attitudes of today but by the attitudes of 2017 과 2018.

    ‘There has been a seismic change in social attitudes for what is acceptable behaviour,’그는 말했다.

    ‘We see the landscape changing.

    ‘There has been a sea of change in the past two years between what can and cannot be said and what may or may not constitute appropriate asides.

    ‘This is the reality of the situation we find ourselves in. We are in remarkably different times than we were two years ago.

    ‘It is also three and a half years since policing has itself changed.

    ‘In relation to the use of closed social media groups of off duty officers, the guidance was not there to officers in 2017 as it is now in 2022.

    ‘There is a huge temptation to retrospectively impose a 2022 view of this material in what was a private communication between adults who knew each other well.

    ‘The correct start is to apply the test that would be applied to a tribunal in 2017/2018.’

    Mr Shaw said the officers had an ‘intention to amuse other, not to ridicule or criticise.

    ‘These proceedings aren’t to protect the feelings of everybody. Almost every joke is capable of upsetting somebody at some time.

    ‘People have been telling each other rude and risqué jokes in time immemorial.

    ‘We would submit the behaviour looked at in the proper context three or four years ago does not amount to gross misconduct.’

    Mr Shaw highlighted the paternalistic nature of modern society.

    ‘People see this type of material and assume that somebody else will be upset about it and they seek to vicariously seek a sanction upon it.

    ‘Stepping back and looking at the behaviour that brings the people before these tribunal, this isn’t the kind of behaviour that requires the conclusion of gross misconduct and requires dismissal.’

    All three officers deny their behaviour amounts to gross misconduct.

    The tribunal continues on Friday.