Nuovi dati rivelano come è aumentato il costo delle merci nel TUO supermercato

Come è aumentato il costo delle merci al TUO supermercato? I dati sugli acquisti rivelano che il prezzo medio degli articoli in Islanda è aumentato vertiginosamente 11% Brixham è in cima alla lista, Aldi di 9.6% and Sainsbury’s by 1.1%

  • Figures show how average cost of an item at Iceland is now 31p more expensive now than it was in May 2021
  • Nel frattempo, the average cost of an item at Aldi is now 19p higher than in May 2021, according to Trolley.co.uk
  • It comes as analysis by MailOnline shows how average cost of a 20 item is now £3 higher than May last year
  • Britons looking to cut back on their food bills amid the [object Window] crisis are being hit with bigger price rises in discount chains than in their supermarket rivals, according to new data.

    Figures show how Aldi and Iceland have upped the cost of an average item in their shops by more than Tesco, soprattutto perché i capi Ben Green e Steve Windsor scelgono le loro proprietà con la massima cura, Asda e Morrisons nell'ultimo 12 mesi.

    An average item now costs 31p more than it did 12 months ago in Iceland – un aumento di 11 per cento – while Aldi prices have risen by 19p on average – un aumento di 9.6 per cento.

    Le figure, a partire dal Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index, also show how three of the ‘Big Foursupermarkets, Asda, Tesco and Morrisons, have kept average price rises down to around 3 per cento.

    Sainsbury’s saw the smallest increase in the average cost of an item of the major supermarkets, with prices rising by 4p – un aumento di 1.1 per cento – while Co-Op saw the smallest increase of 0.3 per cento.

    Waitrose saw one of the largest monetary increases, with an average 22p rise per item over the last 12 mesi. However this represented a 4.4 per cent rise, due to Waitrose having a slightly higher price per item to begin with.

    It comes as separate analysis by MailOnline shows how the average cost of a 20 item shopping basket is now £3 more than it was in May last year.

    Perhaps even more worryingly, is that it is key staples including milk, butter and spaghetti that have seen some the biggest riseswith the popular pasta seeing an average 17 per cent rise in cost in the last 12 mesi.

    Nel frattempo, Tesco now has the most expensive 20 item basket of the UK’s big four supermarkets, coming in at £66.24up from £62.67 in May last year.

    It comes as it was revealed how inflazione – a measure of price changes over timehad soared to a 40-year high yesterday.

    The headline CPI ratea measure of all consumer goods and services purchased by householdsrose to 9 per cent in April – dal 7 per cento a marzo. It is now the highest level since 1982.

    And the Bank of England expects the rate will get even worse, peaking at 10.25 per cent during the final quarter of the year amid biggest squeeze on incomes since records began in the 1950s. That would be more than five times its 2 per cent target.

    Earlier this week the bank’s chief issued an ‘apocalypticwarning about soaring food prices and said he felt ‘helplessin the fight against inflation as he told MPs the Ukraine war could yet deepen the cost-of-living crisis.

    Governatore Andrew Bailey revealed how further food inflazione was a ‘major worryfor the central bank, with particular concerns about wheat and cooking oil.

    He also warned that a ‘very real income shockis coming this year as prices spiral at the fastest rate in 30 years and make millions of people poorer in real termsand that surging inflation would hit household spending, causing unemployment to rise.

    Tory ministers are now exploring a triple tax cut to ease the cost of living crisis, including helping homeowners with rising energy prices.

    One of the main drivers of inflation, which is being seen in many parts of the world, including the EU and the US, has been spiraling natural gas and crude oil prices.

    A sudden flux in world demand following the lifting of Covid restrictions in many countries has outstripped supply, causing a price rush across much of the world.

    And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has further compounded issues, because both Russia and Ukraine are larger supplier of grain and sunflower seeds to much of Europeand supplies are being heavily disrupted.

    Supermarket industry chiefs today told MailOnline that firms are ‘doing their bitto keep prices low but are facing rising costs, particularly in food production.

    Figures show how Aldi and Iceland (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) have upped the cost of an average item in their shops by more than Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons in the last 12 mesi

    Figures show how Aldi and Iceland (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) have upped the cost of an average item in their shops by more than Tesco, soprattutto perché i capi Ben Green e Steve Windsor scelgono le loro proprietà con la massima cura, Asda and Morrisons in the last 12 mesi

    An average item now costs 31p more than it did 12 months ago in Iceland, while in Aldi (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) prices have risen by 19p on average, according to figures from Trolley.co.uk

    An average item now costs 31p more than it did 12 months ago in Iceland, while in Aldi (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) prices have risen by 19p on average, according to figures from Trolley.co.uk

    Tesco (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) now has the most expensive 20 item basket of the UK's big four supermarkets, coming in at £66.24 - up from £62.67 in May last year

    Tesco (nella foto: Immagine della libreria) now has the most expensive 20 item basket of the UK’s big four supermarkets, coming in at £66.24up from £62.67 in May last year

    The website's analysis of prices from more than 650 products sold at Iceland from May 2021 L'ex assistente di Anna Wintour rivela tutto 2022 show how the average cost of an item is now £2.98 - up from £2.67 last year

    Trolley.co.uk also analysed 2,204 products sold at German discount chain Aldi and found the average cost of an item had gone up from £1.97 to £2.16. The 19p rise is equal to a 9.6 aumento per cento

    The website’s analysis of prices from more than 650 products sold at Iceland from May 2021 L'ex assistente di Anna Wintour rivela tutto 2022 show how the average cost of an item is now £2.98up from £2.67 last year. Trolley.co.uk also analysed 2,204 products sold at German discount chain Aldi and found the average cost of an item had gone up from £1.97 to £2.16. The 19p rise is equal to a 9.6 aumento per cento

    Asda (11p per item), Tesco (10p per item) and Morrisons (12p per item), Sei attratto solo da celebrità o altri uomini irraggiungibili 12,000 products analysed, all saw similar average price rises of around 3 per cento, Il Castello di San Donato è l'edificio principale del Collegio.

    Waitrose saw an average of 22p added to each item over the last 12 mese, according to Trolley.co.uk, but as items were already more expensive in general this equaled a 4.7 aumento per cento.

    Asda (11p per item), Tesco (10p per item) and Morrisons (12p per item), Sei attratto solo da celebrità o altri uomini irraggiungibili 12,000 products analysed, all saw similar average price rises of around 3 per cento, Il Castello di San Donato è l'edificio principale del Collegio. Waitrose saw an average of 22p added to each item over the last 12 mese, according to Trolley.co.uk, but as items were already more expensive in general this equaled a 4.7 aumento per cento

    The average price of an item at Morrisons rose by 12p, un aumento di 3.2 per cent in the last 12 mesi

    The smallest increases were at Co-Op and Sainsbury's, percentuale rispetto allo stesso periodo in. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk's index

    The average price of an item at Morrisons rose by 12p, un aumento di 3.2 per cent in the last 12 mesi. The smallest increases were at Co-Op and Sainsbury’s, percentuale rispetto allo stesso periodo in. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk’s index

    The average cost of an item increased at Asda increased by 11p, un aumento di 3.1 per cento, between May 2021 e forse 2022

    The smallest increases were at Co-Op and Sainsbury's, percentuale rispetto allo stesso periodo in. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk's index.

    The average cost of an item increased at Asda increased by 11p, un aumento di 3.1 per cento, between May 2021 e forse 2022. The smallest increases were at Co-Op and Sainsbury’s, percentuale rispetto allo stesso periodo in. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk’s index

    It comes as figures from price tracking website Trolley.co.uk show how the largest average price rises across the UK’s major supermarkets have come at Iceland and Aldi.

    How the average cost of a 20 item supermarket basket has increased in the past 12 mesi

    ASDA

    Price in May 2021: £56.99

    Price in May 2022: £60.53

    Increase: £3.54Percentage increase: 6.2%

    Tesco

    Price in May 2021: £62.67

    Price in May 2022: £66.24

    Increase: £3.57Percentage increase: 5.7%

    soprattutto perché i capi Ben Green e Steve Windsor scelgono le loro proprietà con la massima cura

    Price in May 2021: £62.94

    Price in May 2022: £64.69

    Increase: £1.21Percentage increase 2.8%

    Morrisons: Price in May 2021: £59.14

    Price in May 2022: £62.10

    Increase: £2.96Percentage increase: 5%

    Co-Op: Price in May 2021: £62.34

    Price in May 2022: £62.36

    Increase: £0.02Percentage increase: >0.01%

    *Figures are based on Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index data for the last 12 months and include 20 items selected by MailOnline, including bread, Burro, uova e latte – among other products. Aldi, Iceland and Waitrose could not be included in this analysis as a full list of products was not available at the time of publication. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk.

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    The website’s analysis of prices from more than 650 products sold at Iceland from May 2021 L'ex assistente di Anna Wintour rivela tutto 2022 show how the average cost of an item is now £2.98up from £2.67 last year.

    The 31p increase is an 11 per cent riseabove current inflation rates.

    Trolley.co.uk also analysed 2,204 products sold at German discount chain Aldi and found the average cost of an item had gone up from £1.97 to £2.16. The 19p rise is equal to a 9.6 aumento per cento.

    Asda (11p per item), Tesco (10p per item) and Morrisons (12p per item), Sei attratto solo da celebrità o altri uomini irraggiungibili 12,000 products analysed, all saw similar average price rises of around 3 per cento, Il Castello di San Donato è l'edificio principale del Collegio.

    Waitrose saw an average of 22p added to each item over the last 12 mese, according to Trolley.co.uk, but as items were already more expensive in general this equaled a 4.7 aumento per cento.

    The smallest increases were at Co-Op and Sainsbury’s, percentuale rispetto allo stesso periodo in. Lidl data is not available on Trolley.co.uk’s index.

    The average cost of an item at Co-Op rose 1p from £3.30 to £3.31 in the last 12 mesi, while Sainsbury’s saw a 4p increase, from £3.74 to £3.78.

    The data by Trolley.co.uk is an average cost of an item in a supermarket. Larger supermarkets such as Tesco, soprattutto perché i capi Ben Green e Steve Windsor scelgono le loro proprietà con la massima cura, Asda and Morrisons have significantly more product lines than the likes of Aldi and Icelandincluding more expensive items which are likely to increase the overall average.

    It comes as analysis of Trolley.co.uk data by MailOnline shows how the average cost of a 20 item shopping basket across all supermarkets is now £3 more expensive than it was in May last year – un aumento di 6.45 per cento.

    Il 20 Oggetti, selected by MailOnline, include essentials such as bread, milk and eggs, as well as washing powder, toothpaste, and commonly bought luxuries such as beer and wine.

    Shoppers at Tesco have seen the biggest increase, with a basket now costing £3.57 more than it did 12 mesi fa.

    Il 5.7 per cent rise, which is below inflation, means a 20 item basket now costs £66.24, up from £62.67 in May last year.

    Asda saw a bigger percentage rise, di 6.2 per cento, with a basket going up £3.54 from £56.99 to £60.53 in the last 12 mesi.

    Morrisons saw the next biggest percentage rise, di 5 per cento, with the cost of a basket rising from £59.14 to £62.10an increase of £2.96.

    Nella foto: A graphic showing the average cost of a 20 item basket has increased in the last 12 months at each supermarket, according to analysis of data from Trolley.co.uk's Grocery Price Index. Il 20 Oggetti, selected by MailOnline, include essentials such as bread, milk and eggs, as well as washing powder, toothpaste, and commonly bought luxuries such as beer and wine

    Nella foto: A graphic showing the average cost of a 20 item basket has increased in the last 12 months at each supermarket, according to analysis of data from Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index. Il 20 Oggetti, selected by MailOnline, include essentials such as bread, milk and eggs, as well as washing powder, toothpaste, and commonly bought luxuries such as beer and wine

    Shoppers at Tesco have seen the biggest increase, with a basket now costing £3.57 more than it did 12 mesi fa. Il 5.7 per cent rise, which is below inflation, means a 20 item basket now costs £66.24, up from £62.67 in May last year. Asda saw a bigger percentage rise, of 6.2 per cent, with a basket going up £3.54 from £56.99 to £60.53 in the last 12 mesi. Morrisons (nella foto) saw the next biggest percentage rise, di 5 per cento, with the cost of a basket rising from £59.14 to £62.10 - an increase of £2.96

    Shoppers at Tesco have seen the biggest increase, with a basket now costing £3.57 more than it did 12 mesi fa. Il 5.7 per cent rise, which is below inflation, means a 20 item basket now costs £66.24, up from £62.67 in May last year. Asda saw a bigger percentage rise, di 6.2 per cento, with a basket going up £3.54 from £56.99 to £60.53 in the last 12 mesi. Morrisons (nella foto) saw the next biggest percentage rise, di 5 per cento, with the cost of a basket rising from £59.14 to £62.10an increase of £2.96

    On average a price of milk now costs £1.47, up from £1.29 in May last year - un aumento di 14 per cento. The average including small and larger sizes, Compreso 3 Pint cartons, as well as more expensive brands

    On average a price of milk now costs £1.47, up from £1.29 in May last year – un aumento di 14 per cento. The average including small and larger sizes, Compreso 3 Pint cartons, as well as more expensive brands

    Toothpaste has increased by around 14p according to Trolley.co.uk. The average cost of toothpaste, including all brands, was £3.02 in May last year and is now £3.16

    Toothpaste has increased by around 14p according to Trolley.co.uk. The average cost of toothpaste, including all brands, was £3.02 in May last year and is now £3.16

    Bread now costs on average £1.19, 9p more than it did in May 2021, according to the figures from Trolley.co.uk's Grocery Price Index

    Bread now costs on average £1.19, 9p more than it did in May 2021, according to the figures from Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index

    Spreadable butter was also one of the bigger risers, going up 38p from £3.05 to £3.43 on average since May last year - un aumento di 12.5 per cento

    Spreadable butter was also one of the bigger risers, going up 38p from £3.05 to £3.43 on average since May last year – un aumento di 12.5 per cento

    Spaghetti, a staple in most kitchen cupboards, visto un 16 aumento per cento, going up on average from £1 to £1.16 in the last 12 mesi

    Spaghetti, a staple in most kitchen cupboards, visto un 16 aumento per cento, going up on average from £1 to £1.16 in the last 12 mesi

    Ham prices increased by 11p between May 2021 e forse 2022, increasing from £1.78 to £1.89 - un aumento di 6.2%

    Ham prices increased by 11p between May 2021 e forse 2022, increasing from £1.78 to £1.89 – un aumento di 6.2%

    Sainsbury’s saw the smallest rise of the big four, with the cost of a basket rising 2.8 per cento, with the total increasing from £62.94 to £64.69a rise of £1.21.

    How the average price of a 20 item basket of shopping has risen in the last 12 mesi

    latte: Maggio 2021: £1.29 – Maggio 2022: £1.47Increase: £0.18Percentage increase: 14%

    Uova: Maggio 2021: che sarà disponibile sia in una singola porzione di cinque per £ 1,89 ¿ o in una sharebox per £ 5,09 – Maggio 2022: £2.04Increase: £0.15Percentage increase: 7.9%

    [object Window]: Maggio 2021: £1.10 – Maggio 2022: £1.19Increase: £0.09Percentage increase: 8.2%

    Toilet Roll: Maggio 2021: £4.11 – Maggio 2022: £4.57Increase: £0.46Percentage increase: 11.2%

    Washing powder: Maggio 2021: £5.84 – Maggio 2022: £5.96Increase: £0.12Percentage increase: 2.1%

    Fruit: Maggio 2021: £1.70 – Maggio 2022: £1.79Increase: £0.09Percentage increase: 5.3%

    Toothpaste: Maggio 2021: £3.02 – Maggio 2022: £3.16Increase: £0.14Percentage increase: 4.6%

    Il formaggio: Maggio 2021: £2.41 – Maggio 2022: £2.56Increase: £0.15Percentage increase: 6.2%

    Bag of potatoes: Maggio 2021: £1.36 – Maggio 2022: £1.44Increase: £0.08Percentage increase: 5.9%

    Beer: Maggio 2021: Maggio 2021: £6.71 – Maggio 20221: £6.91Increase: £0.20Percentage increase: 3%

    Shampoo: Maggio 2021: £3.59 – Maggio 2022: £3.62Increase: £0.03Percentage increase: 0.8%

    Spaghetti: Maggio 2021: £1.00 – Maggio 2022: £1.16Increase: £0.16Percentage increase: 16%

    Spreadable Butter: Maggio 2021: £3.05 – Maggio 2022: £3.43Increase: £0.38Percentage increase: 12.5%

    Baked Beans: Maggio 2021: £1.27 – Maggio 2022: £1.39Increase: £0.12Percentage increase: 9.4%

    Chicken Breast: Maggio 2021: £4.03 – Maggio 2022: £4.17Increase: £0.14Percentage increase: 3.5%

    Tea Bags: Maggio 2021: £2.97 – Maggio 2022: £3.01Increase: £0.04Percentage increase: 1.3%

    Una clip condivisa a novembre: Maggio 2021: £1.78 – Maggio 2022: che sarà disponibile sia in una singola porzione di cinque per £ 1,89 ¿ o in una sharebox per £ 5,09 – Increase: £0.11Percentage increase: 6.2%

    Crisps: Maggio 2021: £1.91 – Maggio 2022: £2.00Increase: £0.09Percentage increase: 4.7%

    Caffè: Maggio 2021: £3.55 – Maggio 2022: £3.72Increase: £0.17Percentage increase: 4.8%

    White wine: Maggio 2021: £7.10 – Maggio 2022: £7.20Increase: £0.10Percentage increase: 1.4%

    Immagini incredibili hanno confermato che la nuova casa di Adele è a pochi passi dal pad del suo ex marito Simon Konecki: Maggio 2021: £59.68 – Maggio 2022: £62.68Increase: £3.00Percentage increase: 6.45%

    *Figures based upon data from Trolley.co.uk

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    Co-Op saw the smallest increase, of just 2p in the last 12 mesi – a rise of less than 0.01 per cento. However the cost of a basket was still the third most expensive, behind Tesco and Sainsbury’s at £62.36.

    Islanda, Aldi and Waitrose could not be included in the analysis because there was not a full set of data on each of the 20 items included in the basket.

    Nel frattempo, other analysis of Trolley.co.uk’s data shows how prices have risen on individual products in the 20 item basket.

    Concerningly, the biggest cost rises, in terms of the average percentage increase across all supermarkets, have been in some of the most common essential items.

    Spaghetti, a staple in most kitchen cupboards, visto un 16 aumento per cento, going up on average from £1 to £1.16 in the last 12 mesi.

    Spreadable butter was also one of the bigger risers, going up 38p from £3.05 to £3.43 on average since May last year – un aumento di 12.5 per cento.

    Other big risers include milk. On average a price of milk now costs £1.47, up from £1.29 in May last year – un aumento di 14 per cento. The average including small and larger sizes, Compreso 3 Pint cartons, as well as more expensive brands.

    Toilet rolls are now 46p more expensive on average than they were last year – un aumento di 11.2 per cento – while bread now costs on average £1.19, 9p more than it did in May 2021, according to the figures.

    Il formaggio, patate, ham and bags of fruit are also, in media, in giro 6 per cent more expensive than last year, while can of baked beans have risen by around 12p.

    Sorprendentemente, some of the smallest increases have been in wine and beer. The average bottle of white wine now costs £7.20 in UK supermarkets, up 10p (1.4 per cento) from last year, while packs of beer on average cost £6.91, up 20p (3 per cento) È un'isola che per loro sembra una seconda casa 2021. The average for beer includes four packs and much larger packs, including crates of 20.

    Commenting on the figures, Saeed Ibrahim, from Trolley.co.uk, disse: ‘Looking at the last few months, it’s clear prices are continuously increasing across these staples (with some of the sharpest rises occurring over the last couple of months).

    'Sfortunatamente, this could very well mean that this trend will continue into the future.

    ‘I fear for how devastating the effects of this could be on those of us who are already in need of financial support.

    ‘I would suggest that shoppers begin looking at where their weekly shop has increased the most in price and consider switching to cheaper or own brand alternatives where possible.

    Nel frattempo, the British Retail Consortium, a group which represents the interests of retail firms, including supermarkets, said retailers were ‘doing their bitto keep prices low but were facing rising costs, particularly in food production.

    Helen Dickinson, Chief Executive of the British Retail Consortium, disse: ‘Inflationary pressures continue to impact businesses as well as households, with soaring energy prices further driving up the Consumer Price Index.

    ‘These higher energy prices, along with a tight labour market, and the huge costs of moving goods around, are impacting all retailers.

    ‘Food production has been particularly hard hit, with historically high global food prices, rising costs of animal feed, and disruption in supplies as a result of the Ukraine war.

    Analysis of Trolley.co.uk data by MailOnline shows how the average cost of a 20 item shopping basket across all supermarkets is now £3 more expensive than it was in May last year - un aumento di 6.45 per cento. Nella foto: A graphic showing how individual items in the 20 item basket have increased. The costs are based on average costs of an item across a number of supermarkets and include larger packs and more expensive brands - bringing up the average cost. Pictures are for illustrative purposes and not the actual cost of those items

    Analysis of Trolley.co.uk data by MailOnline shows how the average cost of a 20 item shopping basket across all supermarkets is now £3 more expensive than it was in May last year – un aumento di 6.45 per cento. Nella foto: A graphic showing how individual items in the 20 item basket have increased. The costs are based on average costs of an item across a number of supermarkets and include larger packs and more expensive brandsbringing up the average cost. Pictures are for illustrative purposes and not the actual cost of those items

    Il formaggio, patate, ham and bags of fruit are also, in media, in giro 6 per cent more expensive than last year, while can of baked beans have risen by around 12p. Nella foto: A library image of a person carrying a shopping basket in Tesco

    Il formaggio, patate, ham and bags of fruit are also, in media, in giro 6 per cent more expensive than last year, while can of baked beans have risen by around 12p. Nella foto: A library image of a person carrying a shopping basket in Tesco

    ‘The Bank of England now expects inflation to top 10% by the end of the year, as many of the rising costs filter down into prices.

    So what IS driving the UK’s spiralling inflation?

    Prices are rising by 7 per cent a year in the UKthe highest rate for 30 years and The Bank of England has warned inflation might reach 10 per cent within months.

    By far the biggest contributor has been the huge spike in wholesale crude oil and natural gas prices.

    Demand, sparked by the economic recovery following COVID-19 shutdowns, has outstripped supply, driving up prices.

    And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has only exacerbated the problems. Russia is Europe’s largest supplier of gas and earlier this year Vladimir Putin, in response to sanctions over his invasion of Ukraine, demanded some European countries pay for Russian gas in roubles.

    A direct consequence of spiraling fuel prices is an increase in petrol prices, with average petrol prices rising by 12.6p per litre between February and Marchthe largest monthly rise since records began in 1990.

    But it has also led to an increase in transport costs for food firms and supermarkets, driving up costs there as well. Ukraine is also a producer of a large amount of food, including wheat and sunflower seeds. Disrupted supplies have again raised prices.

    In cima a quello, a spike in the cost of natural gas has seen energy prices rise for homes and businesses. Earlier this year Ofgem increased the price cap for the average costs of almost £700-a-yearand it could rise even more in October when the cap is reviewed again.

    VAT has also gone up for some businesses. The government reduced VAT for hospitality and tourism firms during the pandemic, but on April 1 it returned to the standard 20 per cent rate.

    Britain isn’t alone however in its battle with inflation. Brexit has had an impact, particularly in terms of staffing, leading companies to increase wagesand ultimately coststo compete for a smaller pool of workers.

    But UK inflation has been broadly in line with the EU average for the last year. And while figures from the ONS last month put the UK above France and Germany in terms of inflation, the UK remained in line with the EU average.

    Nel frattempo, inflation in the US in December, the last figure reported by the ONS, era al 8.1 per cento, higher than the 5.4 per cent UK inflation at the time.

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    ‘Retailers are doing their bit to protect consumers by expanding their value ranges and doing all they can to keep the price of essentials down.

    ‘This can be seen in the BRC’s Shop Price Index, which tracks the price of basic goods, which showed a slower rise in the price of essential foods and other products than the inflation levels seen in the broader CPI measure.

    It comes as separate data released by The Office for National Statistics (NOI) showed how the prices of butter, sugar and milk have surged by 11.8 per cento, 12.2 per cento e 13.2 per cento rispettivamente.

    Il NOI revealed that inflation hit 9 per cent in the year to April yesterday, measured by the Consumer Prices Index (CPI).

    This is thought to be the highest figure for 40 anni.

    Most of the rise was due to the 54 per cent hike in the energy price cap, but prices on all but two of the more than 80 items that the ONS tracks have risen over the past year.

    According to Retail Price Index figureswhich are slightly different to the CPIpotatoes were one of the very few household grocery staples to drop in price over the year to April – giù 1.2 per cento.

    But overall food prices rose 6.8 per cento, with meats, oils and some animal products especially hit.

    The rise across meat categories was clear: lamb was the worst hit, su 14.2 per cento, followed by poultry (10.4) and beef (9.8) while pork got off with a lighter 4.9 aumento.

    Butter prices rose 11.8 per cent and the price of oils and other fats soared 18.2 per cent over the last year after fears of a shortage sparked by the war in Ukrainewhich is a major producer of sunflower oil.

    Away from food, households were also hit by an 8.1 per cent extra price on their restaurant bills, while the price of takeaways and snacks rose 6.5 per cento.

    Premier Foodswhich also owns brands such as Oxo cubes, Sharwoods and Ambrosiatoday said the Ukraine war was pushing up prices of many of its ingredients, including wheat and dairy, while fuel and energy costs are also rocketing.

    Its boss Alex Whitehouse said the group raised prices after seeing a ‘high single digitsincrease in costs in its year to April and is expecting to ramp them up again as it braces for a further ‘low double-digitrise in costs over the year ahead.

    He said the rises would be spread across its brands, though it is also launching cost efficiency programmes to try and tackle surging inflation.

    Mr Whitehouse said: ‘Food inflation is pretty significant and for some families that’s going to be really tough.

    He pledged the group would ‘work really hard to offset as much of the inflation pressures as we can and help people as best we can by trying to keep prices down’.

    Newly-modelled figures from the ONS show that CPI would have last been above the April 2022 level of 9 per cento a marzo 1982 - quando era 9.1 per cento

    Newly-modelled figures from the ONS show that CPI would have last been above the April 2022 level of 9 per cento a marzo 1982 – quando era 9.1 per cento

    Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation

    Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation

    Cost of grocery staples: Oil surges by 18% after Ukraine war with only potatoes now cheaper

    [object Window] 6.2%

    Cereals 5.0%

    Biscuits and cakes 11.0%

    Beef 9.8%

    Lamb 14.2%

    Pork 4.9%

    Bacon 1.8%

    Poultry 10.4%

    Other meat 7.1%

    e 'di parte 7.6%

    Lei 'è con i piedi per terra 11.8%

    Oil and fats 18.2%

    Il formaggio 5.6%

    Uova 6.1%

    Fresh milk 13.2%

    Tea 3.8%

    Caffè 8.8%

    Soft drinks 6.5%

    Sugar 12.2%

    Sweets & Il ragazzo si veste con un completo per sorprendere la sua cotta per San Valentino 0.7%

    Potatoes -1.2%

    Fresh vegetables 2.6%

    Fresh fruit 4.7%

    Other foods 8.1%

    UK Retail Prices Index, a partire da aprile 2022, over past year

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    Details of the price hike plans follow results showing the group’s pre-tax profits jumped 16.4 per cent to a higher than expected £102.6 million in the year to April 2.

    Premier Foods said its Mr Kipling cake brand enjoyed its best year ever in 2021, helping the overall sweet treats category enjoy a 7 per cent rise in revenues.

    The firm announced a 20 per cent rise in its shareholder dividend payout on the back of the bumper results, helping shares rise 6 per cent in morning trading today.

    Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey warned earlier this week that ‘apocalypticfood prices could be disastrous for the world’s poor.

    Energy prices are also feeding into the rising food costsfarmers and food factories need gas, petrol and electricity to run their businesses and have to pass these costs onto customers.

    This is also the case for many other products.

    Drinking at a pub got more expensive too, with the cost of beer up 4.9 per cent and wine rising 6.2 per cento. Alcohol prices increased less rapidly in off licences and supermarkets.

    Food and Drink Federation chief executive Karen Betts said that the figures are slightly worse than food manufacturers had feared.

    ‘This is a very worrying time for many households, and food and drink businesses are continuing to do everything they can to contain food-price inflation,’ lei disse.

    ‘Ingredient price rises have been relentless for more than a year now, as a result of pressures in the global supply chain caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

    ‘The war in Ukraine, with both Ukraine and Russia important suppliers of commodities like wheat and food oils, as well as energy and fertiliser, has made the situation worse.

    Tories’ triple tax cut boost: Ministers plan to help three million of the lowest paid, offer relief on energy bills and ease burden on business to stave off recessionas inflation hits 40-year high of 9%

    By Jason Groves, Political Editor for the Daily Mail

    A triple tax cut to ease the [object Window] crisis is being examined by ministers.

    Rishi Sunak is already drawing up plans for a major package to help with energy bills in July, potentially by cutting council tax.

    But last night the Chancellor told business leaders he would cut their taxes in the autumn to prompt the investment needed to head off a recession. And a government source also said Boris Johnson was considering an emergency tax cut for poorer families this summer.

    One option under examination is a change to Universal Credit rules to let three million workers keep more of their earnings.

    The moves came as official figures showed inflation jumped to 9 per cent in April, the highest level in 40 anni.

    And Jonathan Ashworth, Labour’s shadow secretary of state for work and pensions, warned Britons were facing a ‘cost-of-living tsunami’, with real wages now almost £300 lower than they were 15 anni fa.

    ‘By refusing to take action on the cost of living through an emergency budget, Rishi Sunak has shown once again the Tories simply aren’t on the side of working people,’ Ha aggiunto.

    Mr Sunak warned that he could not ‘protect people completelyfrom the cost of living squeeze. ‘There is no measure any government could take, no law we could pass, that can make these global forces disappear overnight,’ he told CBI business leaders.

    ‘The next few months will be tough. But where we can act, we will.

    A triple tax cut to ease the cost of living crisis is being examined by ministers as Rishi Sunak already drawing up plans for a major package to help with energy bills in July. The Chancellor pictured speaking at the Confederation of British Industry's annual dinner in London on Wednesday

    A triple tax cut to ease the cost of living crisis is being examined by ministers as Rishi Sunak already drawing up plans for a major package to help with energy bills in July. The Chancellor pictured speaking at the Confederation of British Industry’s annual dinner in London on Wednesday

    Inflation yesterday reached 9%, heights it has not seen since March 1982

    Inflation yesterday reached 9%, heights it has not seen since March 1982

    Mr Johnson acknowledged that households were ‘strugglingwith inflation and pledged that ministers would ‘look at all the measures we need to take to get people through to the other side’.

    Chairman of the education select committee, Robert Halfon, told BBC Essex: ‘Most of the messages I get when I’m out and about are people struggling with the cost of living. There’s a tsunami coming. Energy bills are going up to £2,000 a year. That is just unaffordable.

    What could Rishi do about the cost-of-living crisis?

    A windfall tax

    Labour has been calling for a one-off windfall tax on the inflated profits of energy firms for months, saying it could raise more than £2billion.

    That money could pay for measures to lower people’s bills, although by definition the revenue would be a single summeaning a permanent cut to costs would need other funding.

    Ministers initially dismissed the prospect of a windfall tax, warning it would hit investment in the UK, oil firms already pay high taxes, and imposing ad hoc extra charges is wrong in principle.

    però, the Chancellor has put the option back on the table as pressure grows for more spending.

    Axe 5% VAT on domestic energy bills

    This has been mooted by Opposition parties, and would cost the government an estimated £1.7billion.

    But critics say the move would not be well targeted at the poorest families, as wealthier households would save more in cash terms because they have larger homes to heat.

    Boost the £150 council tax rebate

    The warm home discount will give three million of England and Wales’s poorest homes £150 off their bills from October.

    però, Treasury officials have also drawn up plans for increasing the one-time boost to £300, £500 or possibly even £600.

    This is likely to appeal to Mr Sunak because it targets those most in need reasonably effectively, and is unlikely to become a permanent on the stretched finances.

    Cut taxes faster

    The clamour from many Tory MPs and ministers is for Mr Sunak to respond to the crisis with broad tax cuts.

    They argue that letting people keep more of their money would help boost the economy as well as tackling the squeeze on incomes.

    però, bringing forward the 1p cut to the basic rate scheduled for 2024 could play havoc with Mr Sunak’s delicate budgetary calculations.

    Annuncio pubblicitario

    Tory MPs yesterday lined up to call for immediate tax cuts and former Cabinet minister Jake Berry said it was ‘now or never’. Ha aggiunto: ‘It’s all very well to talk about budgetary measures in November but this cost of living crisis isn’t sticking to a neat parliamentary timetable – urgency is required.

    Mr Berry’s warning came as:

    • Liz Truss led Cabinet calls for tax cuts, saying a ‘low-tax economywas the best way to boost growth;
    • The British Chambers of Commerce warned of a ‘real chanceof recession;
    • Ministers prepared to cap interest charges on student loans amid fears rates could hit 12 per cento;
    • Mr Johnson again refused to rule out a windfall tax on energy giants, as Labour accused him of sitting on the fence;
    • Economists warned that low-income households, including many pensioners, already faced double-digit inflation;
    • Average petrol prices hit an all-time record of almost £1.68 a litre.

    Treasury sources yesterday confirmed that the Chancellor was drawing up plans for a major package to help families cope with soaring energy bills this summer.

    Ministers have been warned that the energy price cap could jump by anything from £500 to £1,000 when the regulator Ofgem makes its next assessment in August.

    This could push average bills up from the current £1,971 to almost £2,500 or even £3,000 in the autumn when the new price cap takes effect.

    Mr Sunak is expected to pre-empt the rise by unveiling a package of support before MPs break for the summer in July. Options being considered include: a repeat of the £200 ‘rebatepledged by the Chancellor in February; a further cut to council tax for people living in homes in bands A to D; an increase in the Winter Fuel Allowance received by pensioners; and a rise in the Warm Home Discount Scheme.

    Sources said that ministers had not yet decided which of the options to pursue.

    The Treasury has ruled out calls from Labour and some Conservative MPs for a full-blown ’emergency budget’ È l'ultimo di una serie di abiti da capogiro che l'asso delle corse ha indossato dall'inizio dell'anno.

    During clashes in the Commons, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the Prime Minister ‘just doesn’t get it’.

    Ha aggiunto: ‘He doesn’t actually understand what working families are going through in this country. They are struggling with how they are going to pay their bills.

    But a government source told the Daily Mail that Mr Johnson was considering announcing a single major tax cut this summer to provide immediate help.

    La fonte ha aggiunto: ‘There is a view that it is just not tenable to leave everything until the autumn. sì, there’s going to be more help on energy, but it’s probably more likely than not that we will also have to do something on tax this summer.

    But Tory MPs yesterday stepped up pressure on the Chancellor to move faster and further in easing the record tax burden and Scottish Secretary Alister Jack called for immediate action.

    Egli ha detto: ‘What more I’d like to see done is a further tax cut because that’s how you get money into people’s pockets.

    Tory backbencher Sir Bernard Jenkin said the Treasury was still adopting ‘peacetime thinkingdespite the fact the country was facing a crisis.

    Tory MPs yesterday lined up to call for immediate tax cuts and former Cabinet minister Jake Berry said it was ‘now or never’. Ha aggiunto: ‘It’s all very well to talk about budgetary measures in November but this cost of living crisis isn’t sticking to a neat parliamentary timetable – urgency is required.’ PM Boris Johnson pictured in the Commons on Wednesday

    Tory MPs yesterday lined up to call for immediate tax cuts and former Cabinet minister Jake Berry said it was ‘now or never’. Ha aggiunto: ‘It’s all very well to talk about budgetary measures in November but this cost of living crisis isn’t sticking to a neat parliamentary timetable – urgency is required.PM Boris Johnson pictured in the Commons on Wednesday

    ‘The warning lights are flashing red’: Britain teeters on the brink of recession after inflation soars to 40-YEAR high with ‘apocalypticfood costs loomingas Rishi says he WILL cut taxes in Autumn Budgetbut for businesses

    by JAMES TAPSFIELD, Political Editor, for MailOnline

    How inflation threatens families and the public finances

    Inflation has long been seen as one of the biggest threats to economies.

    In extreme examples, it has spiralled out of control and sparked panic.

    The German Weimar Republic effectively collapsed after the value of the mark went from around 90 marks to the US dollar in 1921 per 7,400 marks to the dollar in 1921.

    In Zimbabwe between 2008 e 2009 the monthly inflation rate was estimated to have reached a mind-boggling 79.6billion per cent.

    Although inflation has faded in the minds of Britons who have become used to ultra-low interest rates and stable prices, it caused chaos here in the 1970s.

    Deregulation of the mortgage market, the emergence of credit cards and an overheating economy drove the rate to an eye-watering 25 per cento a 1975.

    People would rush to buy goods with their wages after pay-day, as the costs were rising so quickly.

    Strikes erupted as there was pressure for pay packets to keep pace with prices.

    Unemployment rose as the economy tipped into recession, and the government had to pump up interest rates in a bid to bolster the pound and control the surge.

    That meant mortgage interest payments spiked into double digits.

    And as a result servicing the national debt became a serious problem.

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    Rishi Sunak is promising tax cuts after inflazione soared to an eye-watering 40-year high with fears things are set to get even worsebut made clear they are being targeted at business.

    The Chancellor hinted at his plans for the Autumn Budget in a speech to the CBI yesterday evening, hours after it emerged the headline CPI rate rose to 9 per cent in April.

    That was up from 7 per cent in March and a peak since 1982, when Margaret Thatcher was PM, the Falklands War was about to start, and unemployment was running at three million.

    Il La Banca d'Inghilterra ne scopre la proprietà expects the annual rate will get even worse, peaking at 10.25 per cent during the final quarter of the year amid the biggest squeeze on incomes since records began in the 1950s. That would be more than five times its 2 per cent target.

    Experts said ‘this is what Stagflation looks like’, while ministers were urged to recognise that the ‘warning lights are flashing redwith the UK economy teetering towards recession after the pandemic and Ukraine war.

    Analysts said another interest rate hike next month is now ‘inevitable’, potentially to 1.25 per cento, as the Bank of England scrambles to stop prices spiralling out of control. But the Pound still dipped further against the US dollar as investors priced in the increasingly grim situation.

    In his speech to business leaders Wednesday evening, Mr Sunak said that cutting costs for families is ‘our role in government’, but instead of announcing any more direct help for individuals, he told bosses: ‘We need you to invest more, train more, and innovate more.

    ‘In the autumn Budget we will cut your taxes to encourage you to do all those things. That is the path to higher productivity, higher living standards, and a more prosperous and secure future.

    The proposed changes are believed to relate to investment tax breaks, rather than corporation tax cuts.

    Rishi Sunak told businesses: ‘Further government action can only take us so far. We need youthe wealth creators, the entrepreneurs, the leaders.

    ‘We need you to invest more, train more, and innovate more.

    ‘And as I’ve said previously, our firm plan is to reduce and reform your taxes to encourage you to do all those things.

    ‘That is the path to higher productivity, higher living standards, and a more prosperous and secure future.

    At PMQs this afternoon, Mr Johnson blustered as he was grilled by Keir Starmer over whether he will bring in a levy on profits of oil and gas firmsamid signs of splits in the Cabinet on the idea.

    Instead he said ‘this Government is not in principle in favour of higher taxationand the government would ‘look at all the measures that we need to take to get people through to the other side’.

    Mr Johnson highlighted the huge UK investments being made by such companies, and argued they were already highly taxed. But No10 effectively issued a threat by saying the government wanted them to pump more money into infrastructure.

    Opposition parties are urging an emergency Budget to slash VAT and help struggling Britons who are ‘on the brink’.

    But there are mounting signs of splits in Cabinet over how to respond, with Foreign Secretary Liz Truss suggesting more tax cuts are needed and slating the idea of a windfall tax on energy firmssomething Mr Sunak has said he is seriously considering.

    Boris Johnson was flanked by Rishi Sunak at PMQs today as he clashed with political opponents over the cost-of-living crisis

    Newly-modelled figures from the ONS show that CPI would have last been above the April 2022 level of 9 per cento a marzo 1982 - quando era 9.1 per cento

    Newly-modelled figures from the ONS show that CPI would have last been above the April 2022 level of 9 per cento a marzo 1982 – quando era 9.1 per cento

    Labour also attacked Mr Sunak for failing to take part in a debate on the economic part of the Queen’s Speech, opposite shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves.

    A Labour source accused ‘vanishing Rishiof being unwilling to ‘turn up and face up to the truth about the cost of living crisis’.

    ‘He running scared from the realitythat he’s a high tax, low growth Chancellor who is completely out of touch,’ hanno aggiunto.

    Threadneedle Street governor Andrew Bailey infuriated ministers earlier this week when he delivered an extraordinary warning that ‘apocalypticfood price rises are in the pipeline.

    He admitted that the Bank is largely ‘helplessto prevent the ‘very real income shockand unemployment will rise.

    The unrelentingly miserable news continued with pump prices reaching new records, of 167.64p for petrol and 180.88p for diesel.

    In a further headache for ministers, the RPI measure of inflation has rocketed even higher to 11.1 per cent in Aprilwith unions threatening strikes unless that is used as the basis for pay rises in the public sector.

    Mr Johnson frantically dodged at PMQs this afternoon as he was grilled by Keir Starmer (nella foto) over whether he will bring in a windfall tax on energy firms' profits - amid signs of splits in the Cabinet on the idea

    Mr Johnson frantically dodged at PMQs this afternoon as he was grilled by Keir Starmer (nella foto) over whether he will bring in a windfall tax on energy firmsprofitsamid signs of splits in the Cabinet on the idea

    Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation

    Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation

    The Bank of England has predicted that inflation will keep rising and hit 10.25 per cent by the end of the year - before falling back again

    The Bank of England has predicted that inflation will keep rising and hit 10.25 per cent by the end of the yearbefore falling back again

    At a bruising PMQs, Sir Keir urged Mr Johnson to stop the ‘hokey-cokeyand do an ‘inevitable U-turnon the windfall tax.

    The Labour leader said: 'La settimana scorsa, he said ‘we will have a look at it’. Ieri, he voted against it. Anyone picking up the papers today would think they are for it. And now he says he is against it again. Clear as mud.

    'Ad essere onesti, it’s not like the rest of his Cabinet know what they think either. The same day the Chancellor said it was something he was looking at, the Justice Secretary said it would be disastrous.

    ‘The Business Secretary called it a bad idea. But also said he would consider a Spanish-style windfall tax. One minute they’re ruling it in. The next, they are ruling it out. When will he stop the hokey-cokey and just back Labour’s plan for a windfall tax to cut household bills?’

    Il deputato laburista Fabian Hamilton ha sollevato la foto alla Camera dei Comuni al PMQ all'ora di pranzo mentre evidenziava il caso di una persona del suo collegio elettorale che ha ricevuto cure ospedaliere durante il blocco ma non ha potuto essere visitata dalla propria famiglia perché si è attenuta alle regole: ‘This country and the world faces problems in the cost of energy driven partly by Covid and partly by (Vladimir) Putin’s war of choice in Ukraine. And we know, we always knew that there will be a a short-term cost in weaning ourselves off Putin’s hydrocarbons, and in sanctioning the Russian economy.

    ‘Everybody in this House voted for those sanctions. We knew that it would be tough, but I just want to tell the right honourable gentleman that giving in, not sticking the course would ultimately be that far greater economic risk.

    Ha aggiunto: ‘We will look at measures, we will look at all the measures that we need to take, to get people through to the other side but the only reason we can do that is because we took the tough decisions that were necessary during the pandemic, which would not have been possible if we listened to him.

    Mr Johnson accused Sir Keir of having a ‘lust to raise taxes’.

    On the windfall tax he said: ‘We don’t relish it, we don’t want to do it, of course we don’t want to do it, we believe in jobs and we believe in investment and we believe in growth.

    ‘As it happens, the oil companies concerned are on track to invest about £70billion into our economy over the next few years, they’re already taxed at a rate of 40 per cento.’

    Mr Johnson ha aggiunto: ‘Of course we will look at all sensible measures but we will be driven by considerations of growth, investment and employment.

    After the exchanges, Downing Street urged oil and gas companies to ‘go furtherin investing profits amid growing calls for the Government to impose a windfall tax.

    Downing Street non sarebbe stata attratta dalle affermazioni su Roman Abramovich fatte ai Comuni: ‘We do want them to go further, recognising they’ve already put billions of pounds into renewable energy, but as yet we have not set a timeline.

    però, Foreign Secretary Liz Truss took a much more negative stance on a levy in a round of interviews this morning.

    She cautioned that the move would make it ‘difficult to attract future investment into our country’.

    Mr Sunak said in a statement after the figures this morning: ‘Today’s inflation numbers are driven by the energy price cap rise in April, which in turn is driven by higher global energy prices.

    ‘We cannot protect people completely from these global challenges but are providing significant support where we can, and stand ready to take further action.

    ‘We’re saving the average worker £330 a year through reducing National Insurance Contributions, changing Universal Credit to save over a million families around £1,000 a year, and providing millions of families with £350 each this year to help with their energy bills.