Police warn e-scooter riders they could be taken to court

Police warn e-scooter riders who go on public roads, pavements or cycle lanes they could be taken to court and fined hundreds as boy, 5, suffers multiple injuries after being hit by one in Grimsby

  • The 5-year-old boy was hospitalised after being hit in a pedestrianised area
  • Police warn that private e-scooters can only be used legally on private land
  • E-scooters are classed as ‘power vehiclesand are subject to same laws as cars
  • Riding e-scooters drunk, while on a mobile and on pavements attract penalties
  • Users face £300 fine and six penalty points if they ride without valid insurance
  • Police have issued a warning to e-scooter riders who go on public roads they could be taken to court as a five-year-old boy is suffering from multiple injuries after being hit by one.

    Humberside Police say the boy was struck by an e-scooter which was reportedly being ridden by a man in a pedestrian area in Victoria Street in Grimsby on Monday.

    ‘Thankfully he is now recovering at home but he sustained injuries to his face and legs and needed hospital treatment,’ a spokesperson for Humberside Police said.

    As well as having their e-scooter seized, people can get a £300 fine and six penalty points for not having valid insurance.

    There could also be a £100 fine and three to six points for driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence.

    A five-year-old boy needed hospital treatment after he was struck by an e-scooter which was reportedly being ridden by a man in a pedestrian area in Victoria Street in Grimsby on Monday

    A five-year-old boy needed hospital treatment after he was struck by an e-scooter which was reportedly being ridden by a man in a pedestrian area in Victoria Street in Grimsby on Monday

    Other offences which may result in penalties include riding on the footpath, using a mobile phone, riding through red lights and drink driving offences.

    Humberside Police said: ‘This young boy was badly shaken and injured and we want to prevent anyone else suffering from similar injuries or worse.

    'Ouers, if you have bought an e-scooter for your child at Christmas please make sure they remain within the law.

    ‘Be aware that privately owned scooters are restricted for use solely on private land with the permission of the land owner.

    ‘It is illegal to use a privately owned e-scooter on pavements, cycle paths or roads.

    'Privately owned scooters are restricted for use solely on private land with the permission of the land owned', warned Humberside Police

    ‘Privately owned scooters are restricted for use solely on private land with the permission of the land owned’, warned Humberside Police

    E-scooters are classed as powered vehicles, which means they are subject to the same laws as motor vehicles.

    But at the moment it is not possible to register, insure or tax e-scooters to be used on the road.

    E-scooters injured 131 people over 12 maande

    E-scooters injured 131 pedestrians in Britain over 12 maande, according to new figures.

    Thirty-seven of the casualties suffered injuries described by the Department for Transport as ‘serious’.

    Other road users injured in e-scooter collisions in the year ending June include 36 cyclists and 32 vehicle occupants.

    Fourteen casualties were aged 70 and above, terwyl 17 were between 60 en 69. Twenty-one children under 10 beseer is.

    The figures also show that three e-scooter users were killed in crashes, and a further 729 beseer is.

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    Chief Inspector of Sussex Police, Michael Hodder, gesê: ‘E-scooters are becoming more widely available to purchase, and although it is illegal to ride a privately purchased e-scooter in public, they are not illegal to purchase.

    ‘Many people may have bought one as a gift for Christmas.

    ‘Riders are subject to the same laws a motorist would need to drive lawfully on the road, including the requirement to have a valid licence, insurance, registration plates and vehicle licensing, and to have the correct registration.

    ‘E-scooters are illegal because there are currently no legal ways to register, insure or tax them.

    Police have the power to seize vehicles under section 165 of the Road Traffic Act.

    Across the country there are trials taking place, with the aim of gaining further insight into the environmental, health, and safety benefits of e-scooters.

    But currently there are no areas in Sussex taking part in these trials and e-scooters remain illegal to use on public roads, said Chief Inspector Hodder.

    ‘So please make sure you keep and use your e-scooter on private land only, with the owner’s permission, to ensure this does not happen to you.

    E-scooters can be hired as part of government-backed trials in more than 50 towns and cities across the country.

    Only these devices are legal to ride on the roads.

    But the government simply recommends wearing a helmet and has not insisted it is mandatory like for other motor vehicle road users.

    Privately-owned e-scooters are completely illegal to ride on the roads.

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