Prince Philip's granddaughter follows in the late royal's tracks

Oogpunt! Prince Philip’s granddaughter Lady Louise follows in the late royal’s tracks by showing off her carriage driving skills

  • Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, 18, is following in the tracks of Prince Philip
  • She came sixth as a junior novice at the Indoor Carriage Driving Championships
  • The event took place days after Prince Philip’s memorial service in London
  • Whip in hand, an intensely competitive Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor shows she is a chip off the old block.

    The 18-year-old is following in the tracks of her beloved grandfather Prins Philip by excelling at carriage driving.

    She was cheered on by her father Prins Edward as she took part in the British Indoor Carriage Driving Championships.

    Lady Louise finished sixth in the junior novice class at the event in Grantham, Lincolnshire, die naweek

    Lady Louise finished sixth in the junior novice class at the event in Grantham, Lincolnshire, die naweek

    Lady Louise finished sixth in the junior novice class at the event in Grantham, Lincolnshire, die naweek.

    Driving a black fell pony in her single-seat carriage, she negotiated tight turns as she competed in a series of events.

    One involved trying to negotiate a set of traffic cones without dislodging tennis balls balanced on top.

    The event took place days after the memorial service at Westminster Abbey for Prince Philip, who died a year ago on Saturday aged 99. Philip took up carriage driving in his 50s after retiring from playing polo partly because of a wrist injury

    The event took place days after the memorial service at Westminster Abbey for Prince Philip, who died a year ago on Saturday aged 99. Philip took up carriage driving in his 50s after retiring from playing polo partly because of a wrist injury

    The event took place days after the memorial service at Westminster Abbey for Prince Philip, who died a year ago on Saturday aged 99.

    Lady Louise wore a horse-themed brooch in tribute to her grandfather.

    Last year she told how one reason she took part in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme was to make him proud.

    Philip took up carriage driving in his 50s after retiring from playing polo partly because of a wrist injury.

    He competed well into his 80s.