Real Housewives star Misse Beqiri's brother 'not involved in drugs'

Real Housewives star Misse Beqiri’s brother ‘made his wife take pictures of restaurant before they ate’ on night he was gunned down – as widow denies he was involved in Swedish drug trafficking gang, court hears

  • Flamur ‘Alex’ Beqiri killed in front of wife Debora Krasniqi and two-year-old son
  • Ms Krasniqi can be heard screaming and cradling her son on dramatic CCTV 
  • Alleged shooter Anis Hemissi, 24, is alleged to have dressed as a litter picker  
  • The brother of a reality star gunned down by a hitman was not involved in drug trafficking, his wife insisted today – as it emerged he made her take pictures of a restaurant before they ate there on the night of his death. 

    Flamur ‘Alex’ Beqiri, 36, whose sister, Misse Beqiri, 35, appeared in reality television show The Real Housewives Of Cheshire, was killed in front of his wife Debora Krasniqi and two-year-old son at his £1m family home in Battersea, southwest London on Christmas Eve 2019.

    Ms Krasniqi can be heard screaming and cradling her son on dramatic CCTV footage of the shooting moments after they arrived hand-in-hand with the victim. She told Southwark Crown Court today she did not know what was going on until ‘after he (Mr Beqiri) dropped on the floor’.

    Their three-month old baby and the children’s three grandparents were inside as Mr Beqiri was hit by eight bullets as he was shot at 10 times, Southwark Crown Court has heard.

    Flamur 'Alex' Beqiri, 36, was killed in front of his wife Debora Krasniqi (they are pictured together)

    Flamur ‘Alex’ Beqiri, 36, was killed in front of his wife Debora Krasniqi (they are pictured together) 

    Alleged shooter Anis Hemissi, 24, is said to have donned disguises, including latex masks and a litter picker’s outfit, to carry out reconnaissance in the days before the murder.

    The prosecution believe Mr Beqiri was targeted in an attack designed to cause ‘maximum terror and shock’ because of his links to organised crime and drug dealing in Sweden.

    But giving evidence behind a screen, his widow Ms Krasniqi insisted he was a law-abiding businessman.  

    His barrister Abbas Lakha QC asked Ms Krasniqi today: ‘The prosecution in this case suggest your husband was involved in drug trafficking. Did you know that?’

    ‘I didn’t know that,’ replied Ms Krasniqi, who said she had met her husband in the Netherlands, where he was working in the music industry.

    Mr Lakha said: ‘It is the prosecution suggestion that he was part of an organised crime group in Sweden involved in large scale importation and supply of drugs. Is that true?’

    Ms Krasniqi, who has lived in the capital for most of her life, said: ‘No.’

    Mr Lakha asked the widow about the ‘very particular’ way her husband acted on the night of his killing. 

    He said: ‘On this particular night, you had gone into the restaurant, sat at a table, then taken a photo and sent it to him. Was there a reason?’

    She told jurors: ‘No, he was just that type of person. He was picky about things.’

    Ms Krasniqi told the QC her husband did not have any enemies to her knowledge. 

    The court heard the couple had borrowed £750,000 for their three-floor home, with a £950,000 down payment, and also rented a property in Dubai.

    Ms Krasniqi told police her husband had been ‘very stressed’ in the period before he was shot because he had invested their life savings into a Swedish bank through a broker who turned out to be a fraudster.








    CCTV footage allegedly shows Anis Hemissi, 24, donning the disguise of a litter picker for more than four hours outside their £1.5million home

    CCTV footage allegedly shows Anis Hemissi, 24, donning the disguise of a litter picker for more than four hours outside their £1.5million home 

    Mr Lakha said: ‘Did you believe that had something to do with your husband’s death?’

    She replied: ‘I didn’t believe anything. I just explained why I believed he was stressed.’

    Jurors heard that various family members including the victim’s and his wife’s fathers had been visiting the young family at the time of the attack.

    Minutes after her husband’s shooting Ms Krasniqi called his friend Naeif Adawi on the phone.

    She was allegedly heard telling him: ‘Maybe someone’s coming for you as well. Watch out!’

    But Ms Krasniqi denied warning the other man off, saying she merely called him for support after her husband was shot.

    ‘I told him to come and he said I can’t come, there is a car outside,’ she said.   

    The court heard how local resident Jeremy Lyons had confronted a litter picker said to be Hemissi two days before the incident.

    Prosecutors claim it was Hemissi scoping out the victim’s address in a latex mask.

    ‘It seemed suspicious to me on the basis that he was one minute pretending to pick up paper inside the private estate and the next minute on the public road and I know in fact the two do not meet,’ Mr Lyons said 

    ‘The council never clean on the estate anymore than the private cleaner on the public road.’

    Another angle shows the gunman wearing dark clothing and a second latex mask during his stake out of the property

    Another angle shows the gunman wearing dark clothing and a second latex mask during his stake out of the property

    Mr Lyons, who had been walking his dog at the time, crossed the road to confront the ‘litter picker’.

    ‘I approached him and said what are you doing?

    ‘He just sort of mumbled something and walked off, and I must have said to him to leave the estate or whatever,’ said Mr Lyons.

    After the encounter, Mr Lyons called the police to inform them a man pretending to be a street cleaner had been ‘hanging around all morning’.

    He told the operator that when asked who he was working for, the man replied ‘a company’, adding it was ‘secret’.

    The following day Mr Lyons confronted a different man he saw ‘hovering around’ walking back and forth on his phone.

    After seeing the man described as ‘possibly Eastern European or Mediterranean’ more than once Mr Lyons approached him.

    ‘I asked him what he was doing, can I be of any assistance,’ he said.

    ‘I believe he just mumbled something and walked off.’

    Prosecutor Mark Heywood told jurors that Mr Beqiri was returning home from dinner with his wife after they picked up his young son from the nanny.

    The doorstep of Mr Beqiri's home in Battersea, southwest London, where the shooting took place on Christmas Eve 2019

    The doorstep of Mr Beqiri’s home in Battersea, southwest London, where the shooting took place on Christmas Eve 2019 

    The three were hand in hand with the little boy holding the present he had just received from his nanny.

    ‘As they got close to the house Mr Beqiri went just in front and his wife came just behind with the little boy.

    ‘But the presence of mother and child gave the killer no cause to hesitate. As Flamur Beqiri went through the gate into the paved front of the house, the killer rushed towards them.

    ‘The man in black produced a handgun and fired what must have been almost the entire content of his loaded magazine at the rear, head and torso of Mr Beqiri.

    ‘The semi-automatic discharged on each pull of the trigger and it was fired multiple times, continuing as Mr Beqiri fell.

    ‘The intention was very obvious: first, it was to kill Flamur Beqiri, the target.

    ‘Second, it was to do so in a way calculated to cause maximum terror and shock: that much is clear from the time, the date, the place and the circumstances- all selected.’

    Missé starred on The Real Housewives of Cheshire from March 2016 to May 2017

     Missé starred on The Real Housewives of Cheshire from March 2016 to May 2017

    Along with his partner Azadeh Etesamipour, the Swede planned the attacks, instructed the hitmen and arranged their travel, it is said.

    A post mortem showed Mr Beqiri’s cause of death to be gunshot wounds to the chest and buttocks. He had been struck no less than eight times. 

    The five Swedes, assisted by a Swedish interpreter, are in the dock alongside UK national Rollox.

    Hemissi denies murder and possession of a self-loading pistol. 

    Swedish nationals Estevan Pino-Munizaga, 35, Tobias Fredrik Andersson, 32, and Bawer Karaer, 23, who are alleged to have been sent to assist Hemissi, also deny murder.

    UK national Clifford Rollox, 31, of Islington, north London, and Dutch national Claude Isaac Castor, 21, from Sint Maarten in the Caribbean but resident in the UK, deny perverting the course of justice. 

    Comments are closed.