ROGER LEWIS laments TV's underrepresentation of the over 50s

오, ROGER LEWIS, TV의 50대 이상 과소 대표에 한탄! ROGER LEWIS laments as it’s found the over-50s are under-represented on the box

  • A survey found over 50s are among the most under-represented groups on TV
  • Despite making up 31 per cent of workforce they are just 25.4 per cent of credits
  • Disabled people suffer even worse representation on TV, according to the survey
  • They have a 17 per cent share in the workplace but just 8.3 per cent on television
  • Roger Lewis looks back at a time when the over-50s were better represented
  • We now have proof, as I had suspected, that the TV industry has given up on us oldies.

    A survey shows that the over-50s are among the most under-represented groups on TV.

    Despite constituting a solid 31 per cent share of the adult workforce — i.e. those who aren’t children or (for the moment) staring into space in a care home — the over-50s clock up only 25.4 per cent of programme credits.

    And it’s even worse when it comes to the disabled: 그들은 17 per cent share in the workplace yet just 8.3 per cent of the adults appearing on television are disabled.

    It’s time they re-made Ironside. Do you remember him? Raymond Burr, the tough-talking, crime-cracking police inspector in a wheelchair.

    A survey shows that the over-50s are among the most under-represented groups on TV. Roger Lewis, who says he struggles to find anything worth watching, said the last thing he enjoyed without reservation was Timothy West and Prunella Scales on their narrowboat

    A survey shows that the over-50s are among the most under-represented groups on TV. Roger Lewis, who says he struggles to find anything worth watching, said the last thing he enjoyed without reservation was Timothy West and Prunella Scales on their narrowboat

    In recent weeks we have lost buxom Lynda Baron (센터), Nurse Gladys Emmanuel from Open All Hours. Roger Lewis says TV was better in the 1970s

    In recent weeks we have lost buxom Lynda Baron (센터), Nurse Gladys Emmanuel from Open All Hours. Roger Lewis says TV was better in the 1970s

    If you are a member of an ethnic minority, Kettle Chips 한 봉지를 뜯어 서서 먹고 마신다, you may feel you are well represented. Black and Asian citizens now account for 20.9 per cent of adult appearances on television and play a quarter of all the roles in drama productions — though they make up just 13 per cent of the national workforce.

    It’s similar for gay people. According to the report by the Creative Diversity Network, they form a 6.4 per cent presence in the population, yet are twice as likely to fill our screens — 14.2 per cent of the characters on the box are gay.

    I’m old enough to remember when it was only Larry Grayson.

    As for the elasticated-waistband generation, 잊어 버려.

    현실 세계에서, in Hastings where I live, I am frequently mown down and flung into oncoming traffic by OAPs on mobility scooters. Yet the only mobility scooter I can think of in any drama belongs to the chain-smoking matriarch Madge in ITV’s Benidorm, who hasn’t a civil word to dispense and is mostly flicking V-signs. What a horror.

    For many years I was TV columnist at The Oldie magazine. In the end I chucked in the towel. There was nothing I wanted to watch, nothing that appealed, nothing I could identify with. The programme makers have forgotten us.

    I am not interested in puerile game shows, cakes, mending clocks, 댄스, rescue dogs or anything involving smug people moving house. I am bored by cookery shows and medical shows, with which the schedules are crammed.

    Older folks on television today mean Joanna Lumley pulling faces, or the personalities in The Real Marigold Hotel talking about hip operations and flatulence.

    Whatever happened to Mavis Nicholson? Why no modern equivalent? Mavis filled her afternoon shows by talking in-depth to Elizabeth Taylor, Kenneth Williams and Nina Simone.

    The legendary Michael Parkinson, 너무, had actual conversations with his illustrious guests — see the interview on iPlayer he did with Orson Welles. 오늘, chat shows are nothing but mediocre banter and piffle.

    The best place to see the over-50s is in a hospital bed in Casualty or Holby City. All we are good for is being poorly.

    We also hang about sheepishly in the background in Antiques Road Show, doing our best not to look dead jealous when an old trout starts showing off her Faberge and Lalique, which had been scooped up for a song in a car boot sale.

    The last thing I enjoyed without reservation was Timothy West and Prunella Scales on their narrowboat. There was something soothing about the Britishness of that, the lovely landscapes, the pace (4mph), the human warmth.

    그렇지 않으면, documentaries nowadays always have to be presented by brash comedians trying to be young — who cares what Sue Perkins thinks on any subject? I stopped watching Call The Midwife when I worked out the plot — women have babies.

    Kojak

    The Generation Game

    Roger Lewis said he is nostalgic for Kojak the bald copper and The Generation Game

    As much as I appreciated beautiful Lucy Boynton in her colourful 60s coats, I gave up on the new Ipcress File because it just dragged on and on. There are always too many episodes of everything, don’t you find?

    The Michael Caine film of The Ipcress File is brisk and brilliant — today’s format is to be sluggish. Documentaries are dragged out. Every time we return from a commercial break the information we have already received is repeated all over again, as if audiences are amnesiacs.

    During my insomniac hours I watch shows about mighty cruise ships and lost railway lines.

    In the time it takes to impart one or two facts and move to the next phase, I could qualify as a sea captain or rebuild the Brecon to Merthyr train track with my bare hands.

    In recent weeks we have lost buxom Lynda Baron, Nurse Gladys Emmanuel from Open All Hours, and Anna Karen, the immortal Olive from On The Buses. I grew up with these people and I can honestly say TV was better in the 1970s, because it was free of the woke agenda and political correctness.

    I’m aware my world has gone the way of Spangles and acid drops, but I am nostalgic for Hanna-Barbera and DePatie-Freleng cartoons, Kojak the bald copper, characterful kangaroos (Skippy) and dolphins (Flipper).

    The recent survey showed disabled people are the worst represented group on television. They have a 17 per cent share in the workplace yet just 8.3 per cent of the adults appearing on television are disabled. 사진: Peter Kay as Brian Potter in Phoenix Nights

    The recent survey showed disabled people are the worst represented group on television. They have a 17 per cent share in the workplace yet just 8.3 per cent of the adults appearing on television are disabled. 사진: Peter Kay as Brian Potter in Phoenix Nights

    I used to enjoy Jackie Pallo and Giant Haystacks in the wrestling ring and the classic advertisements starring the PG Tips chimpanzees.

    In one of them, the chimps, dressed as a father and son removals team are taking a piano downstairs and the little one complains: ‘Dad, do you know the piano’s on my foot?’ Like the advert of Terry Scott dressed as a schoolboy saying ‘Hands off my Curly Wurly’ it summed up how things were back then — innocent and alarming simultaneously.

    예, we had Jimmy Savile and Rolf Harris, but we also had Please, 기사 작위가 분노를 일으키자 런던의 회원 클럽을 떠나는 블레어!, Doctor At Large, Up Pompeii! and The Generation Game.

    Who needed the parody Austin Powers when there was the authentic Peter Wyngarde, as Jason King, who dressed in a bizarre 1970s manner but had a sonorous voice?

    사실은, that’s another thing I miss — nobody mumbled.

    Actors and actresses enunciated perfectly, because they’d learned their craft on the classical stage.

    Alan Titchmarsh dropping his aitches was another reason I relinquished my Oldie gig.

    Maybe that’s why television executives would prefer it if the over-50s didn’t exist. We grew up in a cultural environment that was both psychedelic and sordid, with roots in Victoriana.

    Roger Lewis said he used to enjoy the classic advertisements starring the PG Tips chimpanzees

    Roger Lewis said he used to enjoy the classic advertisements starring the PG Tips chimpanzees

    There was Benny Hill and crumpet, as lovely women were called. We had Les Dawson, who remains hilarious, and Charlie Drake, who is a goblin out of Freudian nightmares.

    There was the daftness of Multi-Coloured Swap Shop and the surrealism of Tiswas.

    Tim Davie, the Director-General, said recently: ‘The BBC has prioritised £100 million of our TV content budget to drive change over three years which, with our 20 per cent off-screen diversity expectation for all new commissions, will permanently shift the dial.’

    Can anyone fathom what that may mean in plain language? The only dials I know of are the ones on my parents’ telly for increasing the colour contrast — Kenneth Kendall used to be orange.

    It seems a shame to have a Director-General whose first tongue evidently isn’t English. The corporate jargon is revolting.

    But what I will bet good money on is that the changes and shifts the BBC want to bring about will very definitely not favour oldies like me.