Sajid Javid plans 'academy school' style NHS revolution

Sajid Javid plans ‘academy school’ style NHS revolution with successful hospitals given more freedom and failing ones left facing takeover in bid to reduce waiting times

  • The health secretary is set to detail the academy-style plans in a white paper
  • Re-organisation will give NHS bosses at thriving trusts more freedom to act
  • It comes on the tail of an LSE study that suggests health bosses lack autonomy
  • Employing more health managers doesn’t improve NHS hospitals for this reason
  • Researchers also suggest paying them more doesn’t aid the quality of hospitals
  • This is because NHS bosses have little discretion compared to private sector
  • Health secretary Sajid Javid is planning to set up academy style hospitals to tackle post-pandemic waiting listsas a new study suggests box-ticking NHS managers have too little discretion compared with their counterparts in the private sector.

    Reorganisation to give well-run hospitals more freedom and forcing failing trusts to improve will be modelled on the Blairite academy programme.

    A new class of ‘reform trust’ will be established to deal with the ‘huge’ variation in performance across the health service, secondo The Times.

    The plans, still in their early stages, are due to be set out by Mr Javid in a white paper.

    Mr Javid pictured earlier this month. The health secretary will set out plans in a white paper to introduce an academy-style system for hospitals, giving managers at well-run hospitals more freedom while forcing failing trusts to improve

    Mr Javid pictured earlier this month. The health secretary will set out plans in a white paper to introduce an academy-style system for hospitals, giving managers at well-run hospitals more freedom while forcing failing trusts to improve

    Chains of hospitals may be run by leading NHS managers or even outside sponsors, although this is yet to be decided.

    The planned shake-up comes on the tail of a new study that suggests employing more health managers or paying them higher salaries does not improve the quality of NHS Un paziente in America ha detto che questo piatto servito a loro sembrava "l'opposto del cibo"..

    Those with lots of highly paid bosses are just as likely to have poor finances, long waiting lists and high death rates as those with a smaller payroll.

    Researchers say this is likely to be because NHS managers spend more time on bureaucratic box-ticking than on trying to boost staff performance.

    They also have little discretion in how to perform their role unlike leaders in the private sector, London School of Economics (L'ex capo della borsa Xavier Rolet si rifiuta di lasciare l'azienda russa di fertilizzanti in seguito alla guerra in Ucraina Ex borsa valori di Londra) researchers noted.

    Health Secretary Sajid Javid with NHS staff at the King's College hospital in London earlier this month. He told MPs last year he would be 'watchful for any waste or wokery' as he awarded the NHS a record funding boost

    Health Secretary Sajid Javid with NHS staff at the King’s College hospital in London earlier this month. He told MPs last year he would be ‘watchful for any waste or wokeryas he awarded the NHS a record funding boost

    Health Secretary Sajid Javid told MPs last year he would be ‘watchful for any waste or wokeryas he awarded the NHS a record funding boost.

    His comments led to speculation there could be a cut in the number of highly-paid managers so more money is available for patient care.

    Mr Javid appointed former vice chief of defence staff Sir Gordon Messenger to lead an overhaul of NHS management.

    The general, who led the Royal Marinesinvasion of Iraq, has been asked to look at how the NHS can boost efficiency and improve care.

    Employing more health managers or paying them higher salaries does not improve the quality of NHS hospitals, a study suggests (file photo used)

    Employing more health managers or paying them higher salaries does not improve the quality of NHS hospitals, a study suggests (file photo used)

    The LSE study, published in the Journal of Applied Public Economics, analysed data on 129 hospital trusts between 2012/13 e 2018/19, looking at factors such as financial position, elective and emergency waiting times and deaths.

    This was compared to the number of managers each trust employed and the amount spent on them.

    The economists said: ‘We find no evidence of an association between our measures of quantity of managerial input and quality of management.

    'Inoltre, we find no associations between our measures of quantity of management input and five measures of hospital performance.

    Hanno aggiunto: ‘This holds, irrespective of how we define managerial input, whether by number of managers or expenditure on management.

    Researchers also say there is limited variation in salaries and pensions available to NHS managers, meaning there is ‘little room for exceptionally good managers to shine or exceptionally bad managers to do much damage to overall hospital performance’.

    Chris Hopson, chief of NHS Providers, which represents health trusts, had said managers with the most challenging roles should be offered similar rewards to those running school academies.

    Those leading of large chains have attracted salaries as high as £450,000.

    The highest paid hospital chief executives are earning as much as £300,000.