Senior Russian diplomat accuses the U.S. of starting 'Cold War 2.0'

Senior Russian diplomat accuses the U.S. of starting ‘Cold War 2.0’ by exploiting Moscow after the collapse of the Soviet Union

  • Dmitry Polyansky, deputy ambassador to the UN, said the US was responsible for starting ‘Cold War 2.0’
  • His comments come ahead of a phone call between President’s Biden and Putin 
  • They are due to discuss tensions around Ukraine on Thursday
  • Polyansky said relations between Moscow and the West improved after the break up of the Soviet Union
  • But he said things had changed in the past two decades, with the US now viewing Moscow as a threat 
  • One of Russia‘s top diplomats on Wednesday accused the United States and the West of igniting a new Cold War by betraying the trust shown to them by Moscow after the break up of the Soviet Union.

    It comes at a moment of heightened tension, with Russian troops massing along the Ukrainian border and both sides accusing the other of provocation.

    President Joe Biden is due to talk by phone to his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin on Thursday as each tries to persuade the other to back down.

    Against that backdrop, Russian First Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN Dmitry Polyansky told reporters that the U.S. was responsible for ramping up tensions by viewing Russia as a threat, after relations improved following the end of the Soviet Union.

    ‘Everybody was thinking that people in the West are our friends, that they really are giving us a hand so that we will live in some better place, a better world and nobody will ever remember about the Cold War, about East and West,’ he said, according to the Russian state news agency TASS

    ‘But eventually things have gone other way very quickly.’

    First Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations Dmitry Polyanskiy said the U.S. and the West were responsible for starting Cold War 2.0

    First Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations Dmitry Polyanskiy said the U.S. and the West were responsible for starting Cold War 2.0

    President Joe Biden is due to have a phone call with President Vladimir Putin on Thursday, soon after they held a video call to discuss tensions in Ukraine

    President Joe Biden is due to have a phone call with President Vladimir Putin on Thursday, soon after they held a video call to discuss tensions in Ukraine

    Russian troops have massed along the border with Ukraine raising fears of imminent invasion

    Russian troops have massed along the border with Ukraine raising fears of imminent invasion

    Russian officials fear that NATO is closing in on their territory and have laid out red lines around Ukraine joining the alliance. 

    Some 100,000 Russian troops have been deployed to the Ukrainian border but officials claim it is a defensive measure.

    In his comments, Polyansky said the West had long taken measures to weaken Russia. 

    ‘We saw that the intentions of our colleagues are not as innocent as it was presented at the beginning,’ he said. 

    ‘We saw a lot of Americans and Europeans exploiting our country, trying to split it, to crush it, to split Russia further, to promote separatism in Russia, to promote divisions between Russia and newly emerged states.’

    The first 10 years of modern Russia’s history, he continued, had been tough but things changed in the 2000s.  

    ‘We have started to be perceived as a threat by the West, by the United States,’ he said.

    ‘What we’re having now is kind of a remake of the Cold War, Cold War 2.0.’

    There was no need for confrontation between the East and the West, he added.

    Ukrainian tanks being transported to the Luhansk region. Ukrainian officials fear Russia is planning to launch an invasion in January, which Moscow has denied

    Ukrainian tanks being transported to the Luhansk region. Ukrainian officials fear Russia is planning to launch an invasion in January, which Moscow has denied

    America has been warning for weeks that Putin appears to be readying tens of thousands of troops, tanks and artillery pieces to invade Ukraine, but the Kremlin has insisted it is merely a defence force - until now (pictured, Russian forces currently massed in border regions)

    America has been warning for weeks that Putin appears to be readying tens of thousands of troops, tanks and artillery pieces to invade Ukraine, but the Kremlin has insisted it is merely a defence force – until now (pictured, Russian forces currently massed in border regions) 








    ‘There is no communist ideology that Russia or anybody else promotes, our economic structure is very close to that of the United States, or any other western country, but confrontation is there and the efforts to portray Russia as an enemy are also there,’ he said. 

    ‘It of course brings to your mind some conclusions that the question was not of ideology but of geopolitical struggle, which is back to existence right now, unfortunately.’

    The leaders of the two countries will hold a phone call ‘to discuss a range of topics, including upcoming diplomatic engagements with Russia,’ said National Security Council spokesperson Emily Horne.

    The call, scheduled for Thursday afternoon, will be the second direct contact between Biden and Putin this month as the U.S. looks to pressure Russia to draw down its military threat to Ukraine.

    The conversation was requested by the Russian leader, according to a senior administration official.

    Biden accepted because ‘he has always believed that there is no substitute for direct leader to leader dialogue and engagement, and that is especially true when it comes to Russia and to his engagement with President Putin,’ the official added. 

    He will tell Putin that there is a diplomatic path to de-escalating tensions if he wants to take it, but that he should expect consequences if he invades Ukraine.

    ‘President Biden will also make clear when he speaks with President Putin that we are prepared for diplomacy and for a diplomatic path forward,’ said the official. ‘But we are also prepared to respond if Russia advances with a further invasion of Ukraine.’ 

    Russia has accused the West of provocations by admitting former Soviet states to NATO, and has massed an estimated troops on the border. 

    Ukrainian officials say they fear an invasion could come in the new year. 

    Moscow has repeatedly denied it is planning to invade. 

    But Putin raised the stakes on Sunday by saying he would consider a range of options if the West failed to provide security guarantees preventing Ukraine joining NATO.  

    Moscow submitted draft security documents earlier this month demanding that NATO deny membership to Ukraine and other former Soviet countries.

    Putin warned that Moscow will have to take ‘military-technical measures’ if the West continued its ‘aggressive’ course. 

    Meanwhile, Secretary of State Antony Blinken spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Wednesday about the tensions and outlined Biden’s call with Putin. 

    ‘We will continue to consult closely with Ukraine, NATO allies, and partners in our diplomatic efforts to deter further Russian aggression,’ he said in a tweet.

    Comments are closed.