Sophie Wessex breaks down in tears talking about Prince Philip

Sophie Wessex breaks down in tears talking about Prince Philip and says his death left a ‘giant-sized holein the lives of the Royal Familyas she reveals she was ‘hookedon Line of Duty in lockdown and worked out who ‘Hwas in BBC interview

  • The Countess said Prince Philip’s passing had left a ‘giant-sized hole in our lives
  • The 56-year-old cried as she recalled taking photograph of the Duke and Queen
  • Die beeld, taken on top of Coyles of Muick near Balmoral, was Queen’s favourite
  • Sophie admitted the grieving process is going to take ‘a lot longerdue to Covid
  • She said she had her own ‘lockdown wobbleswhere ‘I just couldn’t see an end
  • Sophie Wessex broke down in tears as she opened up about the death of Prince Philip during an emotional BBC interview.

    The Countess said the Duke of Edinburgh’s passing on April 9 had left a ‘giant-sized hole in our livesduring an interview with Naga Munchetty at St James’s Palace.

    Die 56-jarige, who is married to Prince Edward, choked up as she recalled taking a photograph of the Queen and her husband in Scotland in 2003.

    Die prentjie, taken on top of the Coyles of Muick near Balmoral, was only released by Her Majesty after Prince Philip died and was her favourite.

    In an emotional and wide-ranging interview, recorded earlier this week, Sophie admitted the grieving process is going to take ‘a lot longer’ as gevolg van die pandemie.

    She also told the heartwarming story of Philip ‘chatting awaywith her daughter Louise about carriage-driving and how ‘he was so pleased she took up the sport’.

    And she opened up about her experience of Covid restrictions, saying she had her own ‘lockdown wobbleswhere ‘I just couldn’t see an end to it’.

    But she said it had made her a fan of Call of Duty, before quickly correcting herself and saying Line of Duty.

    Meanwhile the Countess stressed the importance of her work talking about issues such as abuse and rape being used as a weapon in war.








    The 56-year-old choked up as she recalled taking a photograph of the Queen and Prince Philip in Scotland in 2003 (op die foto)

    The 56-year-old choked up as she recalled taking a photograph of the Queen and Prince Philip in Scotland in 2003 (op die foto)

    In an emotion interview, recorded earlier this week, Sophie (pictured with Ms Munchetty) admitted the grieving process is going to take 'a lot longer' due to the pandemic

    In an emotion interview, recorded earlier this week, Sophie (pictured with Ms Munchetty) admitted the grieving process is going to take ‘a lot longer’ as gevolg van die pandemie

    The Royal (pictured at Philip's funeral) was forced to pause as she struggled to hold back the tears as Ms Munchetty asked: 'Are you okay?'

    The Royal (pictured at Philip’s funeral) was forced to pause as she struggled to hold back the tears as Ms Munchetty asked: 'Is jy OK?’

    During the interview Sophie grew increasingly tearful while talking about the Duke of Edinburgh, who she was close to.

    She spoke candidly about the photograph she took of the Queen and her father-in-law in Scotland in 2003.

    Sy het gese: ‘We were lucky enough to go to Scotland for half term and I don’t know if you remember the photograph I took?

    ‘Dit was… ja… I was pregnant with Louise at the time and we went up there during half term.

    The Royal was forced to pause as she struggled to hold back the tears as Ms Munchetty asked: 'Is jy OK?’

    Sy gaan voort: ‘And just to be there, in that placewas an oh my god moment. So I think they’ll come and go. But you have to let them come and let them go.

    ‘But just talking to you now it’s a bit of an oh my goodness moment which you don’t necessarily expect and you don’t expect them to come.

    ‘I had the same when I lost my mother. You know I’d be fine, absolutely fine fine fine, then something happened or you’d hear a piece of music or you’d do something then suddenly you would, jy weet, get taken off at the knees.

    ‘So there will be lots of moments like that but it’s good to remember.

    Sy gaan voort: 'And just to be there, in that place... was an oh my god moment. So I think they'll come and go. But you have to let them come and let them go'

    Sy gaan voort: ‘And just to be there, in that placewas an oh my god moment. So I think they’ll come and go. But you have to let them come and let them go

    Sophie Wessex donned a stunning floor length gown with a matching headpiece for the Royal Ascot yesterday

    Sophie Wessex donned a stunning floor length gown with a matching headpiece for the Royal Ascot yesterday

    The photograph in Scotland showed the Queen and Prince Philip at one of their ‘happy places’.

    They would go to the Coyles of Muick hills to walk and picnic throughout their long lives together.

    Haar majesteit, 95, so loved the place that she named one of her new corgi puppies after it.

    The couple look blissfully happy in the shot and relaxed as they sat back in the heather.

    The Queen was wearing her off duty Scottish dress of a woollen twinset, pearls and a tartan skirt, with Prince Philip in country casuals and a sun hat resting on his knee.

    Sophie said the loss of the Duke in April had left a ‘giant-sized hole in our livesand the grieving process is going to take ‘a lot longer’ as gevolg van die pandemie.

    Sy het gese: ‘Well he’s left a giant-sized hole in our lives. I think unfortunately the pandemic has slightly skewed things, inasmuch as it’s hard to spend as much time with the Queen as we would like to.

    ‘We’ve been trying to, maar natuurlik, it’s still not that easy. And of course the normal way of things isn’t normal yet, so we’re not necessarily doing the things that we would normally have done with him.

    ‘So I think the whole grieving process is probably likely for us to take a lot longer. It may be the same for many other families out there.

    ‘Because if you’re not living with somebody, 24/7, the immediate loss isn’t necessarily felt in the same way, as if somebody was in the house with you all the time.

    Sophie said the loss of the Duke in April had left a 'giant-sized hole in our lives' and the grieving process is going to take 'a lot longer' due to the pandemic. Op die foto: The Royals on the Queen's 90th birthday

    Sophie said the loss of the Duke in April had left a ‘giant-sized hole in our livesand the grieving process is going to take ‘a lot longer’ as gevolg van die pandemie. Op die foto: The Royals on the Queen’s 90th birthday

    Sophie welcomes increased attention as a Royal after Megxit and Philip’s death but raises her eyebrows at the nickname ‘Magnificent Seven

    Sophie, Gravin van Wessex, has welcomed her increasing important role as a senior member of the Royal Family.

    But the Queen’s daughter in law raised her eyebrows when she was told she was dubbed a member of the ‘Magnificent Seven’.

    Palace officials are said to have given the nickname to the Queen, Prins Charles en Camilla, Prince William and Kate Middleton and Prince Edward and Sophie Wessex.

    The Countess said the ‘increased interestin her and Prince Edward in recent years could ‘only be a good thingto help her raise awareness for her work.

    Sy het gese: ‘There is increased interest in us as a family but, if it raises more awareness of the issues I care about, then that can only be a good thing.

    The Wessexes have slotted in as senior royals after the death of Prince Philip and the bitter departure of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle last year.

    One of Sophie’s main interests is eliminating of sexual violence in conflict.

    She has travelled to India and Kosovo to meet women who have been raped or sexually abused during wars.

    The Royal also holds royal patronages in more than 70 liefdadigheidsorganisasies.

    These include London School of Fashion and the Wessex Youth Trust.

    She is also a Global Ambassador for the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness.

    With the latter, she has visited Sudan, Nepal and India to help eradicate avoidable blindness.

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    She also told the heartwarming story of Philip ‘chatting awaywith her daughter Louise about carriage driving and how ‘he was so pleased she took up the sport’.

    She said the 17-year-old, who took a cart out for a ride on the morning of the Duke’s death, was encouraged by her grandfather.

    The Countess said: 'Hy was so bly toe sy die sport begin het, want ek het dit aangepak… Ek was oukei.

    ‘Well I was really at the beginning of my carriage driving career when I fell pregnant with Louise.

    ‘So I then had to sort of hang up the reins. So I was really delighted when she decided she wanted to have a go.

    ‘And my father in law was always so good at encouraging her. So When she not only said please can I have a good but then showed a flair for it he was just brilliant with her.

    'Hulle het altyd daaroor gesels en hy sou altyd opdaag as sy in die Groot Park meeding, he would always turn up and watch her and watch her training days.

    She also told a charming anecdote of the time Prince Philip moved her dressage practice area from a bumpy paddock at Balmoral to the front lawn to help her.

    In the wide-ranging interview with BBC Radio 5, Sophie admitted to having her own ‘lockdown wobbleas she struggled to ‘see an end to it’.

    Sy het gese: ‘I think every now and then I certainly had the odd wobble, where I just couldn’t see an end to it I couldn’t visualise how this was all going to pan out.

    ‘Life, all the normal things that we could do, had just…it was like sand through your hands.

    ‘Nothing felt tangible anymore. It was the number of disappointments, Ek veronderstel. We all got very good at managing disappointment.

    ‘I think our whole foundation has been shaken by this. We’re putting so much faith in the scientists in coming up with vaccines, and goodness, I’m just in awe of what they’ve done. But we’re sort of holding our breath.

    ‘There will be more variants, we know that. Every time there is a new variant, we just have to hold our breath and hope that the vaccines are good enough to stand up against them. So, how am I? Like everybody else I suppose: just taking one day at a time.

    But in a charming slip of the tongue, Sophie mistook the hit BBC TV show Line of Duty for the shooting game Call of Duty.

    Ms Munchetty asked her what he programme of choice had been over the last year and a half.

    The Countess said: ‘Good question. Call of Duty.The presenter asked: ‘Ag! Line of Duty?’ Sophie replied: ‘That’s the one.

    It was claimed earlier this week the Queen was also a fan of the police drama and would often chat with aides about the show’s never ending twists and turns.

    In a charming slip of the tongue, Sophie mistook the hit BBC TV show Line of Duty for the shooting game Call of Duty

    In a charming slip of the tongue, Sophie mistook the hit BBC TV show Line of Duty for the shooting game Call of Duty

    Sophie continued: ‘I am so bad! I am so bad at remembering the names of anything, whether it comes to books, whether it comes to programmes, films, enigiets.

    ‘I’ll go, ”ooh you know that one with what’s his name?” I’m so bad at it. I’d never watched it and I started the first episode and that was it, I was hooked.

    She also revealed she had worked out actor Nigel Boyle’s character Ian Buckells was the infamous H.

    Sy het gese: ‘I was really disappointed in myself for having guessed it. Because I was, yes … I kept on thinkingIt can’t be, it can’t be him but it’s got to be. There isn’t any other choice. There is no-one else that it could be”. ek bedoel, it wasn’t long before the end. But it was long enough I think.

    The Countess went on to discuss the ongoing prevalence of rape and sexual violence as weapons of war in global conflicts.

    She told Ms Munchetty: ‘I think the more conversations that take place, and the more confident girls and young women are to talk about these things and to call it out and to call out any kind of behaviour they’re not happy with, hopefully that might give them more confidence. The more people come forward, the more momentum it will hold.

    ‘My children are different ages and different sexes, you have to measure how you talk about these things.

    'My dogter, al is hulle bekommerd oor hoe hulle aandag tussen klein kinders sal verdeel 17, and she’s very aware of this kind of thing. Her school have a lot of debates about all sorts of things whether it be to do with feminism or ethnic equality.

    ‘They are constantly talking about these things. She’s quite aware of the work I do with women, peacebuilders, and also the conflict-related sexual violence pieces as well.

    ‘We chat about it quite a lot and particularly, if I’ve been on a trip somewhere she wants to know where I’ve been and what I’ve been doing.








    Sy het bygevoeg: ‘She has a natural curiosity about it and it’s easier to have that conversation with her.

    ‘With my son, hy is 13 going on 14. It’s slightly harder to have that conversation about my work.

    ‘He’s at that age where he’s much more aware of girls around him and everything. But interestingly he’s quite conscious of this whole issue of inappropriate behaviour between girls and boys.

    ‘He does seem quite aware of it, and I think that’s partly to do with schools and partly what they chat about on social media.

    ‘I think it’s about having honest, open conversations as a family, but also hopefully in school settings as well.

    Sophie in January admitted hearing the stories of sexual violence survivors had taken her to ‘some very dark placesduring her work to raise awareness about their plight.

    The countess committed herself to supporting the UK’s work helping victims of rape, sexual violence and exploitation in war on International Women’s Day in 2019.

    In an address at a virtual UN event for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict in June 2020, Sophie said sexual violence in the home or during conflicts is likely to have ‘risen substantially’ tydens die pandemie.

    She reaffirmed her commitment to champion the Women, Peace and Security agenda and the UK’s Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative.

    Piers Morgan led praise for the Countess of Wessex, twiet: ‘Very moving, and one of the best descriptions of grief that I’ve heard. Sophie’s an impressive lady.

    Ms Munchetty posted: ‘For those who have grieved, and are still grieving. It is heartbreaking to lose a loved one, wie jy ook al is. x. #BeKind.

    Vroeër vandeesmaand, the countess told the Telegraph the royals are ‘still a family no matter what happens’.

    It followed tensions earlier this year in the aftermath of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s bombshell interview with Oprah Winfrey.

    Her BBC interview at St James’s Palace was earlier this week ahead of the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict on June 19.

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