Student reveals the differences between the UK and the US

US student at Edinburgh University reveals the differences between the UK and America including Britons’ love of ‘sweetcorn on pizza’, treating every illness with paracetamol and going to the beach when it’s 59F

  • Scarlett Attari, who is from  Kentucky studies History at Edinburgh University
  • She’s becoming a viral sensation for sharing the differences between US and UK
  • Student has racked up more than 2.2M likes on TikTok with a 21-part series
  • Discusses how British people use paracetamol and ibuprofen to treat any illness
  • An American student who has lived in Scotland for three years has pointed out the differences she’s noticed between the UK and US, including how British people love sweetcorn on pizza and how they have ‘no school spirit’.

    Scarlett Attari, who is originally from Louisville, Kentucky and now studies history at Edinburgh University has become a viral sensation sharing the differences across the pond, including how people react to the weather, the way electricity works and university living arrangements.

    In one video, the student  who has racked up more than 2.2million likes on TikTok with a 21-part series, discusses how British people use paracetamol and ibuprofen to treat any illness.

    @sscarlettka

    I just wouldn’t think to take ibuprofen for a fever before ?? Or is it just me #sscarlettka #americanintheuk #scotland #scotlandtiktok #usvsuk

    ♬ Monkeys Spinning Monkeys – Kevin MacLeod

    ‘The way people in the UK treat painkillers is different to the US. You could have any injury in the UK and they’d say “take a paracetamol and ibuprofen”‘.

    She explained how British people will take the painkiller for broken bones, a fever and tonsillitis while she’s never heard a doctor in the US prescribe paracetamol and that antibiotics are more commonly advised.

    Scarlett also added that in the US you can buy packets of 500 200mg tablets of ibuprofen and paracetamol, whereas in the UK you can only get packs of 16. 

    The student also said that she decided to study in the UK because the ‘education is great’ and that Edinburgh is ‘beautiful’ and that it’s easy to travel around the rest of the UK and Europe.  

    Scarlett Attari, who is originally from Louisville, Kentucky and now studies History at Edinburgh University has become a viral sensation sharing the differences across the pond, including how people react to the weather, the way electricity works and university living arrangements

    She is pictured describing the differences in heat between the UK and US

    Scarlett Attari, who is originally from Louisville, Kentucky and now studies History at Edinburgh University has become a viral sensation sharing the differences across the pond, including how people react to the weather, the way electricity works and university living arrangements. She is pictured describing the differences in heat between the UK and US

    Her other observations include how British people think 15C (59F) is 'bloody hot' and want to go to the beach, while 26C (78F) is a 'chilly spring day' where she's from, where she'll be wearing a jacket.

    Her other observations include how British people think 15C (59F) is ‘bloody hot’ and want to go to the beach, while 26C (78F) is a ‘chilly spring day’ where she’s from, where she’ll be wearing a jacket.

    Her other observations include how British people think 15C (59F) is ‘bloody hot’ and want to go to the beach, while 26C  (78F) is a ‘chilly spring day’ where she’s from, where she’ll be wearing a jacket.

    Scarlett also noted that British plugs having switches is ‘annoying’ because she plugged her laptop for hours and didn’t realise it wasn’t charging. 

    She also noted many difference between studying – and that in the US students have to study for four years, with one year taking general education classes before specialising. The student also described how in the US, many people share a room during the first year of university, which is unheard of in the UK.

    Discussing school and University sport, she went on: ‘In the US, school spirit is very big. In the UK it is not.

    Discussing school and University sport, she went on: 'In the US, school spirit is very big. In the UK it is not.

    She added: 'In the US, at University it is very significant which school team you support. People wear the uniforms all the time, there's huge stores dedicated to just selling university merchandise. And people get very into this''

    Discussing school and University sport, she went on: ‘In the US, school spirit is very big. In the UK it is not. In the US, at University it is very significant which school team you support. People wear the uniforms all the time, there’s huge stores dedicated to just selling university merchandise. And people get very into this’

    She added that even at high school level, there's pep rallies and merchandise for school teams, but that she's 'never heard of school spirit' in the UK

    She added that even at high school level, there’s pep rallies and merchandise for school teams, but that she’s ‘never heard of school spirit’ in the UK

    ‘In the US, at University it is very significant which school team you support. People wear the uniforms all the time, there’s huge stores dedicated to just selling university merchandise. And people get very into this.

    ‘In the UK, it’s just not an industry to get school spirit’.

    She added that even at high school level, there’s pep rallies and  merchandise for school teams, but that she’s ‘never heard of school spirit’ in the UK.   

    The student went on that the ‘best thing’ about the UK was that there are ‘no bugs’ and that she ‘needed screens’ to keep cicadas out at home. 

    Scarlett also described how in Kentucky you ‘can’t buy alcohol on a Sunday’ and that in the US alcohol is sectioned off in separate parts of shops.

    Perhaps most surprisingly, she noted that British people ‘love sweetcorn’ and ‘always have it on pizza’,’ adding that she was shocked that Domino’s has it as an option. 

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