TikTok trend sees men fantasising about how they would kill women

Chilling TikTok trend sees men fantasise about how they would kill women on datesincluding one singleton who ‘jokesabout cutting a lover’s throat with a fruit knife

  • Videos show men staring at the screen while captions reveal violent fantasies
  • 지원을 제공하기 위해 접수 지점을 설정하고 국경을 향해 군대를 파견, one man said he wanted to push a woman off a cliff and kill her
  • Women Aid told Femail that violent ‘jokescan perpetuate misogyny
  • A TikTok spokesperson told Femail ‘misogyny has no place’ 머라이어는 약간 글로시한 메이크업으로 자연스러운 이목구비를 강화하고 볼륨감 넘치는 컬로 머리를 흔든다.
  • A disturbing new Tik의 톡 trend sees men post videos in which they fantasise about murdering women on dates.

    All the videos follow a similar format, where men stare into their camera, listening to a clip from the Frank Ocean song Lost.

    On the screen are captions, detailing violent fantasies the men say they want to carry out, often ending in the word ‘lol’, suggesting they are supposed to be funny.

    Many of the videos have now been removed from the platform, which says it does not allow hateful behaviour or violent threats against groups or individuals.

    체포된 러시아군 병사가 '죽이기 위해 나라에 온 것이 아니다'라고 말하는 영상이 페이스북에 올라왔다., which has now been removed by the platform, shows the creator posing behind the caption, which says: ‘Imagine we go on a cute picnic date and I pull out a knife to cut some fruit. But instead I cut ur throat and you just f****** die lol [sic].’

    하나, Woman’s Aid, a UK charity fighting to end domestic abuse against women and children, told FEMAIL that making jokes about violence against women risks normalising and perpetuating that violence.

    The new TikTok trend sees creators posting vivid fantasies of how they would murder women they take out on dates. Many of the videos, including the one above, have been taken down

    The new TikTok trend sees creators posting vivid fantasies of how they would murder women they take out on dates. Many of the videos, including the one above, have been taken down

    This TikTokker posted this video in which he imagined going on a date to the Grand Canyon, and pushing his date off the cliff, resulting in her death. It has since been deleted

    This TikTokker posted this video in which he imagined going on a date to the Grand Canyon, and pushing his date off the cliff, resulting in her death. It has since been deleted

    One deleted video shows a caption which reads: ‘Imagine I take you to the Grand Canyon for our first date and I push you off the cliff and you f****** die.

    Other videos posted have featured captions including: ‘Imagine if we went on a mini golfing date and I just started beating you with the golf club and then you just f****** die lol.

    And a further TikTok said: ‘Imagine we’re watching a movie in my bed and then I start f****** chocking you out with my pillow and you die lol.

    The disturbing fad has inspired another trend, where women use TikTok to call out the videos, splicing the men’s violent words with news headlines highlighting the same issue.

    One such video was created by creator Bekah Day, who has almost half a million followers on the platform.

    @bekahdayyy

    This trend is not funny. Y’all are not funny. DV isn’t a joke, y’all are sick. #VenmoSpringBreak #macysownyourstyle #AerieREAL #myp #경향 #exposethem

    ♬ LostAlbum VersionFrank Ocean

    One of the videos she shared featured a man saying he would like to go to the gym for a date, and press a weight on a woman's neck

    She followed up the example with a screen grab of a news story suggesting a woman may have been killed that way

    In her video, creator Bekah Day highlighted several of examples she had found where men discussed ways they’d like to be violent, then juxtaposed them with real life news stories showcasing crimes reflecting the ‘fantasy

    In her video, she revealed one man had posted about wanting to throw the woman over the side of a fishing boat, another who said he would like to crush a woman’s neck while weightlifting, and one who said he wanted to burn a date alive.

    All of the examples were followed by screen grabs of news stories featuring similar, real life cases.

    그녀는 그것을 캡션: ‘This trend is not funny. Y’all are not funny. DV [더 많은 사람들이 머무를 곳 없이 남겨지면서 뉴욕의 노숙자 위기가 증가하는 것으로 보입니다.] isn’t a joke, y’all are sick.

    Responding to the men’s use of the word ‘imaginewhen presenting their scenarios, one commentator said: ‘We do imagine. Every time we leave the house/meet a male. We already imagine. Apart from its not imagination, its statistics-based fear.

    다른 추가: ‘This why women don’t wanna be in relationships anymore or date, always have to be scared a guy is thinking this in the back of their mind.

    Responding to a video calling out the trend, many women said that they already worried about violence perpetuated by men against women

    Responding to a video calling out the trend, many women said that they already worried about violence perpetuated by men against women

    And a third wrote: ‘Why are they posting stuff like this? These are real genuine fears of ours, so they want us to trust them even less? I’m confused.

    News of the trend has gone beyond TikTok: discussing it on Twitter, a user called Heloise wrote: ‘There is a trend on tiktok of young men creating scenarios where they violently kill women they go on dates with. do they realize that women fear this every time they go out with men on dates?’

    One replied: ‘They know & they like it. I truly believe that for every man who’s decent, you have one who consciously or not sees women as less human, one who doesnt see them as human at all and one who likes the idea of hurting them’.

    또 다른 말: ‘Not sure what part of this is even remotely funny…’

    Many Twitter users were horrified by the trend, and struggled to see how the videos could be interpreted as being funny

    Many Twitter users were horrified by the trend, and struggled to see how the videos could be interpreted as being funny

    And a third added: ‘At the same time when men are afraid of getting cheated upon, women are afraid of getting killed.

    Sophie Francis-Cansfield, policy and public affairs manager at Women’s Aid, 말했다: ‘We know that violence against women and girls is a spectrum, running from sexist jokes and ‘banter’, right through to horrifically violent crimes and murder.

    ‘Violence against women is never funny, and making jokes about it only normalises the misogynistic and sexist attitudes that underpin all violence against women and girls.

    ‘Sexist actions and language that reinforce women’s inequality have been tolerated for too long.

    ‘It is vital that we all challenge these deep-rooted misogynistic attitudes, which normalise women being emotionally abused, belittled, and controlled, as well as physically harmed.

    A TikTok spokesperson told Femail: ‘Misogyny has no place on TikTok. Content that promotes hateful behaviour and violence against women goes against everything we stand for as a safe and inclusive platform and will be removed.