Tudor paintings found in 'discovery of a lifetime' in a rundown house

Stunned experts find ‘discovery of a lifetimebehind 1970s paint job in ‘undistinguishedbedroom of rundown old house: Tudor wall paintings based on designs in Nero’s Golden Villa

  • Calverley Old Hall, in North Yorkshire, is undergoing a major renovation
  • The building is run in part as a holiday let and is owned by The Landmark Trust
  • Mid-16th century paintings were discovered behind the peach coloured walls
  • The discovery is ‘a time machine to the age of the Reformation and Virgin Queen
  • A routine repair job has uncovered the ‘discovery of a lifetime’, revealing wall-to-wall Tudor paintings inspired by Nero’s Golden Villa.

    Calverley Old Hall, in North Yorkshire, is undergoing a major renovation programme funded by The Landmark Trust, which has owned the building and runs part of it as a holiday let since 1981.

    The find was made in the bedroom of the ‘unremarkableparlour block, where the walls had been painted peach in the 1970s.

    Behind the 19th-century plaster, a complete scheme of mid-16th century paintings was discovered, across three walls of the original chamber.

    The Landmark Trust Director Anna Keay said: ‘There, on all three walls before me, was a revelation.

    ‘Floor to ceiling, wall to wall, a complete, highly decorated Tudor chamber, stripped with black and red and white and ochre. Mythical creatures and twining vines, classical columns and roaring griffins.

    A routine repair job has uncovered the 'discovery of a lifetime', revealing wall-to-wall Tudor paintings inspired by Nero's Golden Villa

    A routine repair job has uncovered the ‘discovery of a lifetime’, revealing wall-to-wall Tudor paintings inspired by Nero’s Golden Villa

    Calverley Old Hall, in North Yorkshire, is undergoing a major renovation programme funded by The Landmark Trust , which has owned the building and runs part of it as a holiday let since 1981. The find was made in the bedroom of the 'unremarkable' parlour block, where the walls had been painted peach in the 1970s

    Calverley Old Hall, in North Yorkshire, is undergoing a major renovation programme funded by The Landmark Trust , which has owned the building and runs part of it as a holiday let since 1981. The find was made in the bedroom of the ‘unremarkableparlour block, where the walls had been painted peach in the 1970s








    To add to the excitement, the Calverley scheme is so-called Grotesque work, making it a great deal more sophisticated than almost any other surviving domestic wall paintings in the country.

    Landmark Historian Caroline Stanford described the discovery as ‘a time machine to the age of the Reformation and the Virgin Queen’.

    Lei disse: 'Ad un tratto, we are transported from a dusty, dilapidated building into the rich and cultured world of the Elizabethan Calverleys, a well-educated family keen to display their learning and wealth by demonstrating their appreciation of Renaissance culture.

    ‘The Calverley paintings are very carefully planned, in a vertical design that uses the timber studwork as a framework.

    A complete scheme of mid-16th century paintings were discovered across three walls of the original chamber

    A complete scheme of mid-16th century paintings were discovered across three walls of the original chamber

    The Landmark Trust Director Anna Keay described the find of the mid-16th century paintings as a 'revelation'

    The Landmark Trust Director Anna Keay described the find of the mid-16th century paintings as a ‘revelation

    A close-up of the 'floor to ceiling, wall to wall' paintings that have been discovered in the old house

    A close-up of the ‘floor to ceiling, wall to wallpaintings that have been discovered in the old house

    Landmark Historian Caroline Stanford described the discovery as 'a time machine to the age of the Reformation and the Virgin Queen'

    Landmark Historian Caroline Stanford described the discovery as ‘a time machine to the age of the Reformation and the Virgin Queen

    The remains of Nero's Domus Auerea, or Golden Villa, are seen in Rome

    The remains of Nero’s Domus Auerea, or Golden Villa, are seen in Rome

    The remnants of the designs inside Nero's palace can still be seen by visitors today

    The remnants of the designs inside Nero’s palace can still be seen by visitors today

    ‘Teethed birds laugh in profile; the torsos of little men in triangular hats sit on vases or balustrades.

    The Grotesque style refers to the Italian word ‘grotteschi’, meaning ‘from the grotto’.

    In the 1480s, a young man exploring a hillside in Rome, tumbled down a cleft, falling into what he believed to be a grotto.

    Exploring further by torchlight, he and his friends discovered not a grotto but the glittering interiors of Emperor Nero’s buried Golden Villa, built in the 1st century CE.

    So infamous was this emperor that his successors buried his summer palace, as part of their attempts to blot out the memories of his excesses.

    The wonder can be visited today in Romethough hard hats are a necessity.

    The Tudor paintings are 'very carefully planned' and are in a vertical design that uses the timber studwork as a framework

    The Tudor paintings are ‘very carefully plannedand are in a vertical design that uses the timber studwork as a framework

    The wall-to-wall, ceiling-high Tudor paintings are said to have been inspired by Nero's Golden Villa

    The wall-to-wall, ceiling-high Tudor paintings are said to have been inspired by Nero’s Golden Villa

    The Calverley scheme is so-called Grotesque work, which makes it more sophisticated than almost any other surviving domestic wall paintings

    The Calverley scheme is so-called Grotesque work, which makes it more sophisticated than almost any other surviving domestic wall paintings

    The historic paintings reach from the floor of the bedroom up to its ceiling and spread across three walls

    The historic paintings reach from the floor of the bedroom up to its ceiling and spread across three walls

    The painting is in the Grotesque style, which refers to the Italian word 'grotteschi', meaning 'from the grotto'

    The painting is in the Grotesque style, which refers to the Italian word ‘grotteschi’, meaning ‘from the grotto

    Landmark has launched an appeal to raise £94,000 to preserve and hopefully display the paintings

    Landmark has launched an appeal to raise £94,000 to preserve and hopefully display the paintings

    Upon the discovery, the fantastical designs inside the villa soon became popular in the houses of the educated elite across Italy.

    By the 16th-century, the Renaissance design had found its way to Britain courtesy of printed books from the Low Countries and Germany.

    It is likely that the unknown painter who decorated the wall at Calverley was inspired by such print books, the trust speculated.

    Ms Stanford added: ‘The most likely person to have commissioned the painted chamber seems to be Sir William Calverley. He was knighted in 1548, and became Sheriff of York in 1549, a man of high estate and important affairs.

    ‘We believe that the painted chamber was only ever reached at first floor level from the family’s private rooms and had its own private access directly onto the gallery of the family chapel.

    ‘Perhaps it was Sir William’s privy chamber, where he entertained only his closest friends and associates. Or perhaps it was his second wife, Elizabeth Sneyd’s private parlour, a refuge from vigorous Sir William’s seventeen offspring.

    Landmark has launched an appeal to raise £94,000 to preserve and hopefully display the miraculous Tudor paintings.

    WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE ROMAN EMPEROR NERO?

    One of history's most bloody tyrants, Nero appears to have derived much of his chilling ambition from his wealthy widowed mother, Agrippina.

    One of history’s most bloody tyrants, Nero appears to have derived much of his chilling ambition from his wealthy widowed mother, Agrippina.

    One of history’s most bloody tyrants, Nero appears to have derived much of his chilling ambition from his wealthy widowed mother, Agrippina.

    Il suo primo marito, Nero’s father, died of natural causes, but she is widely suspected of murdering her second.

    She embarked on her third marriage, to the Emperor Claudius, in AD 49, and although he already had a son, Britannicus, by another wife, manipulated him into adopting Nero as his heir.

    She then had Claudius killed with poisoned mushrooms, clearing the way for her son to inherit the Empire in AD 54.

    Quindi solo 16, Nero was described by Suetonius as being of average height, with a prominent belly and a spotty complexion.

    ‘He never wore the same garment twice,’ wrote Suetonius. ‘It is said that he never made a journey with less than 1,000 carriages, his mules shod with silver.

    He also had a terrible and vengeful temper. quando, less than six months into his reign, Nero suspected a plot to replace him with Britannicus, he followed his mother’s example and killed his 15-year-old stepbrother with poisoned mushrooms.

    Prossimamente, even his mother was subjected to his murderous gaze. She is believed to have conducted a lurid incestuous affair with her son to maintain control over himbut he soon tired of her constant interference and had her stabbed to death in AD 59.

    in poco tempo, it was his wife Octavia’s turn. After divorcing her on a false charge of adultery, he banished her from Rome and had her maids tortured to death.

    But this wasn’t enough to satisfy Nero’s bloodlust. Poco dopo, he cut off Octavia’s head, and presented it as a trophy to his mistress, Poppaea.

    Poppaea became his second wifebut not for long. When she complained that he had returned home late from the races, Nero kicked his pregnant wifeand her unborn baby – a morte.

    Nero then married a third time, after forcing the husband of his intended bride, Messalina, to commit suicide.

    Disguising himself with caps and wigs, he delighted in creeping into the seedier quarters of Rome to beat up drunks, who would be stabbed and thrown into the sewers if they put up a fight.

    Non sorprende, Nero became ever more unpopular with his people, not least after the Great Fire of Rome, which razed large swathes of the city in AD 64.

    Some alleged that Nero had deliberately ordered the conflagration to make way for the ultimate statement of his power: the Golden House. Certamente, soon afterwards, taxes were raised to fund the construction of this fabulously ostentatious palace.

    The entrance was guarded by 120ft bronze statue of Nero, while inside the palace grounds were an amphitheatre and a complex of bath-houses. Exotic creatures were left free to roam the gardens.

    But the piece de resistance was the rotating dining room, where Nero would stage his infamous feasts.

    There guests would dine on the most extraordinary delicacies, including peacock, swan, stuffed sow’s wombs and roasted dormiceoccasionally vomiting into special-bowls to allow them to continue their culinary orgy.

    Gorging on gallons of wine, they retired only to enjoy sex between courses. And to keep the party going, the bisexual Nero invited male and female prostitutes to mingle with his guests.

    One of his favourite party tricks was to dress up in the skin of a wild animal, and have himself imprisoned in a cage while helpless young men and women were tethered to posts in front of him.

    He would then ravage them one by one, roaring like a beast as his fawning admirers applauded.

    He also regarded himself as a talented musician and writer, and if there were no Christians to burn, he might then insist on subjecting his audience to his lute-strumming or interminable poetry recitals.

    Nero often inflicted such performances on the people of Rome, appearing in theatres and insisting that the doors be locked so nobody could leave until he had finished.

    Allo stesso modo, there was no respite for Nero’s guests in the rotating dining room. On and on the parties went until, finally, they were allowed to leave.

    The only consolation for those who abhorred such evenings was that the coenatio rotunda, as the rotating hall was known, did not turn for long.

    The Golden House was only completed in AD 68 – the same year in which Nero faced a revolt by those sick of high taxation and the emperor’s profligate spending.

    Declared a public enemy by the Senate, Nero was forced to commit suicide by stabbing himself in the throat, stopping only to lament: ‘What an artist the world loses in me.

    Dopo la sua morte, the palace was stripped of its treasures, and within a decade the site had been filled in and built over. It was only rediscovered in the 15th century, when a local youth fell into the remains of the structure.

    Within days, people were letting themselves down on ropes so they could admire the elaborate wall paintings that remainedamong them the artists Raphael and Michelangelo, who carved their names into the walls.

    Annuncio pubblicitario

    I commenti sono chiusi.