Turkey flash flood deaths rise to 27 as Greece controls wildfires

Turkey flash flood deaths rise to 27 after emergency workers recover more bodies overnight as Greece says it has finally brought wildfires under control

  • 少なくとも 27 have died in floods and mudslides in Turkey and President Erdogan has planned a visit to the region
  • Greek wildfires were brought under control on Friday after ravaging country’s islands for more than a week
  • Temperatures are forecast to peak again in Spain, イタリア, and Portugal on Friday, in Europe’s heatwave latest
  • The death toll from Turkey’s flash floods rose to 27 on Friday as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan prepared to inspect one of the hardest-hit regions and lend his moral support.

    The devastation across Turkey’s northern Black Sea regions came just as the disaster-hit country was winning control over hundreds of wildfires that killed eight people and destroyed swathes of forest along its scenic southern coast.

    It is the latest in a bout of extreme weather in the Mediterranean which has also baked in blistering temperatures this week and which are expected to rise again on Friday as the ‘Luciferheat dome continues to grip southern Europe.

    Wildfires that have ravaged Greece for more than a week were brought under control on Friday, but blazes in Italy and Algeria raged on.

    Turkey also suffered another bout of flooding in the northeastern province of Rize last month that killed six.

    Floods in Turkey are the latest in a bout of extreme weather in the Mediterranean which has baked in blistering temperatures this week and which are expected to rise again on Friday as the 'Lucifer' heat dome continues to grip southern Europe

    Floods in Turkey are the latest in a bout of extreme weather in the Mediterranean which has baked in blistering temperatures this week and which are expected to rise again on Friday as the ‘Luciferheat dome continues to grip southern Europe

    The death toll from Turkey's flash floods soared to 27 on Friday as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan prepared to inspect one of the hardest-hit regions and lend his moral support

    The death toll from Turkey’s flash floods soared to 27 on Friday as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan prepared to inspect one of the hardest-hit regions and lend his moral support

    Search and rescue workers evacuate a girl during flash floods that have killed 27 in Bozkurt, a town in Kastamonu province, 七面鳥

    Search and rescue workers evacuate a girl during flash floods that have killed 27 in Bozkurt, a town in Kastamonu province, 七面鳥

    World scientists believe that natural disasters like those in Turkey are becoming more intense and frequent because of global warming and climate change

    World scientists believe that natural disasters like those in Turkey are becoming more intense and frequent because of global warming and climate change

    World scientists believe that natural disasters like those in Turkey are becoming more intense and frequent because of global warming and climate change.

    They also pose a serious challenge to Erdogan two years before Turkey’s next scheduled general election.

    The powerful Turkish leader was roundly condemned on social media for tossing out bags of tea to locals while visiting one of the fire-ravaged regions when the wildfires were first spreading at the end of July.

    Polls show that the climate is a top priority for up to seven million members of Generation Z whose votes Erdogan will need to extend his rule into a third decade in the 2023 投票.

    Erdogan has so far said little about the flooding.

    ‘I offer my condolences to the loved ones of our 17 fellow citizens who lost their lives,’ he said when the toll was still 17 CNNの最高マーケティング責任者は誰ですか.

    His office said that Erdogan was speaking on the phone to regional leaders and promising to deliver all the assistance available to the state.

    Emergency services said waters briefly rose in some parts as high as four metres (13 足) before subsiding and spreading across a region stretching more than 150 マイル (240 キロメートル) 幅.

    Residents survey the damage after flash floods and mudslides caused by heavy rainfall in Zafer village, Turkey on Friday

    Residents survey the damage after flash floods and mudslides caused by heavy rainfall in Zafer village, Turkey on Friday

    Search and rescue efforts in Bozkurt district of Kastamonu, 七面鳥, continued on Friday morning after the death toll from the flash floods rose to 27

    Search and rescue efforts in Bozkurt district of Kastamonu, 七面鳥, continued on Friday morning after the death toll from the flash floods rose to 27

    Search and rescue efforts continued on Friday morning ahead of a visit from Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

    Search and rescue efforts continued on Friday morning ahead of a visit from Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan

    Cars were left strewn across streets and stuck in mud after floods and mudslides hit a residential area in Bozkurt district of Kastamonu in Turkey

    Cars were left strewn across streets and stuck in mud after floods and mudslides hit a residential area in Bozkurt district of Kastamonu in Turkey

    Turkey's disaster and emergency agency said severe floods and mudslides had killed at least 29 people with others missing on Thursday

    Turkey’s disaster and emergency agency said severe floods and mudslides had killed at least 29 people with others missing on Thursday

    七面鳥: The floods battered the Black Sea coastal provinces of Bartin, Kastamonu, Sinop and Samsun on Wednesday, demolishing homes and bridges and sweeping away cars as helicopters scrambled to rescue people stranded on rooftops

    七面鳥: The floods battered the Black Sea coastal provinces of Bartin, Kastamonu, Sinop and Samsun on Wednesday, demolishing homes and bridges and sweeping away cars as helicopters scrambled to rescue people stranded on rooftops

    Search and Rescue team members evacuate locals during flash floods which have swept through towns in the Turkish Black Sea region

    Search and Rescue team members evacuate locals during flash floods which have swept through towns in the Turkish Black Sea region

    Agriculture and Forestry Minister Bekir Pakdemirli warned on Wednesday that the area was facing ‘a disaster that we had not seen in 50 または 100 何年も.

    Rescuers have been forced to evacuate a hospital holding 45 患者 – four of them in intensive carein the region around the coastal city of Sinop.

    Images on television and social media showed stranded villagers being plucked off rooftops by helicopter and bridges collapsing under the force of the rushing water below.

    The Anadolu state news agency said Thursday that rescuers were focusing on a four-floor apartment building that partially crumbled and another one next to it that completely collapsed.

    Images showed parts of both river-front buildings toppling into the rushing flood of brown water below.

    Turkey’s disaster response authority said 25 people had lost their lives in the northern Kastamonu province and two in the neighbouring region of Sinop. One person was still missing.

    Weather services predicted rains to continue to lash the affected area for the remainder of week.

    Flames rise after a forest fire broke out in Bucak district of Burdur, 七面鳥

    Flames rise after a forest fire broke out in Bucak district of Burdur, 七面鳥

    七面鳥: Firefighters are still working to extinguish wildfires in Mugla province, an area popular with tourists that runs along the Aegean Sea

    七面鳥: Firefighters are still working to extinguish wildfires in Mugla province, an area popular with tourists that runs along the Aegean Sea

    七面鳥: At least eight people and countless animals died and thousands of residents have had to flee fierce blazes

    七面鳥: At least eight people and countless animals died and thousands of residents have had to flee fierce blazes

    The devastation across Turkey's northern Black Sea regions came just as the disaster-hit country was winning control over hundreds of wildfires that killed eight people and destroyed swathes of forest along its scenic southern coast

    The devastation across Turkey’s northern Black Sea regions came just as the disaster-hit country was winning control over hundreds of wildfires that killed eight people and destroyed swathes of forest along its scenic southern coast

    GREECE WILDFIRES UNDER CONTROL

    Fires burning for over a week that caused Greece’s worst ecological disaster in decades were finally brought under control on Friday.

    The fire department said there was no longer any ‘major active front, just scattered pocketsof wildfires.

    Rain and falling temperatures helped the fire-dousing effort, but crews remain on alert for possible flare-ups in hard-to-access ravines on the island of Evia and in the region of Arcadia in the Peloponnese, 広報担当者は言った.

    But with high winds forecast for the weekend, the bulk of a huge multinational force that assisted Greek firefighters this week remains in place, civil protection spokesman Spyros Georgiou said.

    ‘They are helping to monitor the perimeters of burned areas in Evia and Arcadia, which are many kilometres (マイル) 長いです,’ 彼は言った.

    ‘Many of them are actually requesting to remain,’ Georgiou said.

    Mitsotakis on Friday appointed a new minister in charge of recovery from natural disasters in a bid to defuse growing anger over the struggle to curb wildfires that have charred thousands of hectares of forest.

    The new deputy minister, Christos Triantopoulos, will be responsible for aid and recovery from natural disasters, a new post created to compensate businesses and families hard hit by recent blazes.

    Hundreds of homes and many businesses have been destroyed in Evia, Arcadia and the outskirts of Athens in the prolonged fire wave that struck Greece from late July and intensified last week, during the worst heatwave in decades.

    Greece is just one of a number of countries in the Mediterranean region that have been hit by a savage fire season.

    Heatwaves have become more likely due to climate change, 科学者は言う. As global temperatures rise over time, heatwaves are predicted to become more frequent and intense, and their impacts more widespread.

    Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis on Thursday described the infernos as Greece’s ‘greatest ecological disaster in decades’.

    He pledged hundreds of millions of euros in reconstruction, reforestation and flood prevention works.

    ‘[Recovery funds] will begin to be disbursed in a few daysand they will be greater than ever before, to all those affected,’ the prime minister told a news conference on Thursday.

    The government has come under withering criticism from locals in stricken areas whose income from agricultural products and tourism has been wiped out.

    There have been growing calls for the resignation of top public safety officials who as recently as June had insisted that the country was well-prepared.

    Mitsotakis on Thursday said the country had battled some 600 blazes in a week, some of them ‘mega fires’.

    But he admitted: ‘It seemed that this particular phenomenon exceeded our capabilities and the preparations put in place.

    An aerial photograph of forest near the village of Pefki on the island of Evia, ギリシャ, shows the damage caused by wildfires that burned for over a week

    An aerial photograph of forest near the village of Pefki on the island of Evia, ギリシャ, shows the damage caused by wildfires that burned for over a week

    Fires burning for over a week that caused Greece's worst ecological disaster in decades were finally brought under control on Friday after thousands of hectares of forest went up in flames

    Fires burning for over a week that caused Greece’s worst ecological disaster in decades were finally brought under control on Friday after thousands of hectares of forest went up in flames

    A shepherd walks with his goats near a burnt area around Krioneritis village on Evia island on Thursday after devastating fires ravaged the region

    A shepherd walks with his goats near a burnt area around Krioneritis village on Evia island on Thursday after devastating fires ravaged the region

    Greek villagers have refused to evacuate and are working around the clock to save their homes as wildfires continued to ravage the island of Evia

    Greek villagers have refused to evacuate and are working around the clock to save their homes as wildfires continued to ravage the island of Evia

    HEAT WARNINGS FOR SPAIN, フランス, ITALY AND PORTUGAL

    Temperatures have soared over southern Europe this week and are forecast to peak again on Friday with highs of 104F (40C) expected in Italy.

    Meanwhile the Spanish weather office said that 15 of Spain’s 17 regions were on alert for high temperatures, with the mercury forecast to reach highs of between 97F and 104F (36-40C) on Friday in much of the country.

    Temperatures could hit 115F (46F) in the provinces of Seville, Cordoba and Jaen in the southwestern Andalusia region.

    Hot weather, also expected to push the mercury to 104F (40C) in Portugal, is expected to last until Monday.

    Temperatures topped 100F (38C) by early afternoon on Thursday in Rome, as the 'Lucifer' heat dome kept its grip on southern Turkey

    Temperatures topped 100F (38C) by early afternoon on Thursday in Rome, as the ‘Luciferheat dome kept its grip on southern Turkey

    Stifling heat hit Rome on Thursday, driving people indoors at midday, triggering drinking water restrictions, and turning public libraries into cooling 'climate shelters'

    Stifling heat hit Rome on Thursday, driving people indoors at midday, triggering drinking water restrictions, and turning public libraries into cooling ‘climate shelters

    The local National Health Service offices in Rome and Bologna telephoned older residents who live alone to see if they needed groceries or medicines delivered so they wouldn't venture out in the searing heat

    The local National Health Service offices in Rome and Bologna telephoned older residents who live alone to see if they needed groceries or medicines delivered so they wouldn’t venture out in the searing heat

    A young boy cools off in a fountain in Piazza Castello in Turin as temperatures topped 100F across much of southern Europe - and are expected to rise again on Friday

    A young boy cools off in a fountain in Piazza Castello in Turin as temperatures topped 100F across much of southern Europeand are expected to rise again on Friday

    Meanwhile firefighters brought a wildfire in a forest in Spain’s northeastern region of Catalonia under control on Friday as scorching temperatures put most of the country at risk for blazes.

    約 100 firefighters worked overnight to tame the blaze in the Spanish province of Tarragona, which forced the evacuation on Thursday of about 30 campers and has destroyed about 75 ヘクタール (185 エーカー) of protected forest, Catalonia’s firefighting service said in a tweet.

    The fire was under control on Friday morning, だが 11 water trucks, a helicopter and two water-dropping planes were still at the scene of the blaze, the service added.

    Elsewhere in Spain, dozens of firefighters were battling a wildfire which broke out on Thursday evening near the town of Rubia, in the verdant northwestern region of Galicia.

    This fire has so far destroyed about 200 hectares of land, the regional government of Galicia said in a tweet.

    ALGERIA ARRESTS 22 SUSPECTED ARSONISTS AFTER WILDFIRES KILL 69

    Algeria has arrested 22 people suspected of being behind the most devastating wildfires in the country’s history that killed 65 人, President Abdelmadjid Tebboune said on Thursday, calling the fires a ‘disasterand urging the preservation of national unity.

    Dozens of forest fires have hit mountainous areas in northern Algeria since Monday, mainly in Tizi Ouzou, the main province of the Kabylie region east of the capital, Algiers.

    ‘Some fires have been caused by high temperatures but criminal hands were behind most of them,’ Tebboune said in a live speech on state television.

    ‘We have arrested 22 容疑者, 含む 11 in Tizi Ouzou. Justice will perform its duty.

    少なくとも 28 military men were among the dead as the North African country deployed the army to help firefighters contain fires that ravaged several houses in forested areas.

    ‘It’s a disasterdisaster. But our strength will not collapse,’ Tebboune said, praising aid caravans from other provinces to provide affected regions with food, medicine and donations of other material.

    ‘We must preserve national unityI insist on national unity,’ 彼が追加した.

    In addition to soldiers on the ground, the army has been using six helicopters to extinguish blazes. The are supported by two firefighting planes hired from the European Union and which have been in action since early Thursday.

    The government will receive two more planes from Spain on Friday and a third one from Switzerland in the next three days, Tebboune said.

    Tebboune has declared three days of national mourning starting on Thursday after the death toll climbed to at least 69, 含む 28 soldiers deployed to help overstretched emergency services.

    Residents in Tizi Ouzou, Algeria, desperately try to extinguish wildfires after at least 69 人, 含む 28 兵隊, were killed fighting the blazes

    Residents in Tizi Ouzou, Algeria, desperately try to extinguish wildfires after at least 69 人, 含む 28 兵隊, were killed fighting the blazes

    Algeria has arrested 22 people suspected of being behind the most devastating wildfires in the country's history that killed 65 人

    Algeria has arrested 22 people suspected of being behind the most devastating wildfires in the country’s history that killed 65 人

    Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune has declared three days of national mourning starting on Thursday after the death toll climbed to at least 69, 含む 28 soldiers deployed to help overstretched emergency services

    Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune has declared three days of national mourning starting on Thursday after the death toll climbed to at least 69, 含む 28 soldiers deployed to help overstretched emergency services

    Volunteers unloaded humanitarian aid to people affected by the wildfires in Ait Daoud village, in the region of Kabylie in Algeria

    Volunteers unloaded humanitarian aid to people affected by the wildfires in Ait Daoud village, in the region of Kabylie in Algeria

    A woman carries bottles of water for people affected by wildfires in the village of Ait Daoud, in northern Algeria on Thursday

    A woman carries bottles of water for people affected by wildfires in the village of Ait Daoud, in northern Algeria on Thursday

    UN REPORT: MAN-MADE GLOBAL WARMING MUST BE REVERSED

    The UN report, which as been dubbed a ‘code red for humanity’, said the Earth is likely to warm by 1.5C within the next 20 years — a decade earlier than previously expected — and heatwaves, flooding and droughts will become more frequent and intense.

    Scientists had expected temperatures to rise by 1.5C above pre-industrial levels between 2030 そして 2052 but now believe it will happen between this year and 2040.

    ‘It’s just guaranteed that it’s going to get worse,’ said report co-author Linda Mearns, a senior climate scientist at the US National Center for Atmospheric Research. ‘I don’t see any area that is safe… Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide.

    The report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (国連の気候変動に関する政府間パネルの科学者) was produced by 200 scientists from 60 国.

    Drawing on more than 14,000 科学論文, the review included the latest knowledge on past and potential future warming, how humans are changing the climate and how that is increasing extreme weather events and driving sea-level rises.

    The authors said it was ‘virtually certainthat heatwaves ‘have become more frequent and more intense across most land regions’.

    They also said a rise in sea levels approaching two metres by the end of this century ‘cannot be ruled out’, while the Arctic is likely to be ‘practically sea ice-freein September at least once before 2050.

    If temperatures continue to rise, there could be devastating effects here on Earth, including a dramatic loss of sea-life, an ice-free Arctic and more regular 'extreme' weather

    If temperatures continue to rise, there could be devastating effects here on Earth, including a dramatic loss of sea-life, an ice-free Arctic and more regular ‘extreme’ 天気

    ‘We can’t wait. The signs are unmistakable’: Biden urges US action after doomsday UN report says global warming is ALREADY causing extreme weather and the world will heat up by 2.7F by 2040 – a decade earlier than forecast

    US President Joe Biden has sounded the alarm on climate change following the release of a bombshell United Nations report dubbed a ‘a code red for humanity.

    ‘We can’t wait to tackle the climate crisis. The signs are unmistakable. The science is undeniable. And the cost of inaction keeps mounting,’ Biden said in a statement Monday, as he urged the US and world nations to swiftly limit greenhouses gasses.

    The Earth is likely to warm by 2.7F within the next 20 年 – a decade earlier than previously expectedand heatwaves, flooding and droughts will become more frequent and intense, Oxana Opalenkoは、ポーランドに足を踏み入れた直後に、友人のYuliaの生後2か月の息子Meronを抱えています。’ 政府は、洋上風力発電と新しい原子炉への支援を期待して、木曜日に新しいエネルギー戦略を打ち出します。 (国連の気候変動に関する政府間パネルの科学者) assessment.

    月曜日に, 234 experts warned in the report that the US is headed for disaster. Flooding, deadly fires and heat waves will not only become the norm but will intensify in a warming world, warns the 3,949-page assessment.

    Humans have already heated the planet by roughly 2 華氏度 (1.1C), since the 19th century, largely by burning coal, oil and gas for energy – with the US being one of the world’s top producers.

    Scientists had expected temperatures to rise by 2.7F (1.5C) above pre-industrial levels between 2030 そして 2052 but now believe it will happen between this year and 2040.

    広告

    しかしながら, some experts say there is still hope that cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases could stabilise rising temperatures.

    Scientists involved in the report said the 1.5C or 2C thresholds are not cliff edges the world will fall off, but that every bit of warming makes a difference, so it is important to curb temperature rises as much as possible.

    Professor Richard Betts, from the Met Office Hadley Centre and a contributing author to the report, 前記: ‘Like the speed limit on a motorway, staying below it is not perfectly safe and exceeding it does not immediately lead to calamity, but the risks do increase if the limit is passed.

    ‘Limiting warming to 1.5C clearly needs much more urgent emissions cuts than is currently happening, but if the target is still breached we should not assume all is lost and give upit will still be worth continuing action on emissions reductions to avoid even more warming.

    The report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (国連の気候変動に関する政府間パネルの科学者) was produced by 200 scientists from 60 国.

    Drawing on more than 14,000 科学論文, the review included the latest knowledge on past and potential future warming, how humans are changing the climate and how that is increasing extreme weather events and driving sea-level rises.

    The authors said it was ‘virtually certainthat heatwaves ‘have become more frequent and more intense across most land regions’.

    They also said a rise in sea levels approaching two metres by the end of this century ‘cannot be ruled out’, while the Arctic is likely to be ‘practically sea ice-freein September at least once before 2050.

    ファイル画像, Prime Minister Boris Johnson called it ‘sobering readingand said it was clear the next decade was going to be pivotal to securing the future of the planet.

    ‘We know what must be done to limit global warmingconsign coal to history and shift to clean energy sources, protect nature and provide climate finance for countries on the frontline,’ 彼が追加した.

    And US President Joe Biden urged the country and world nations to swiftly limit greenhouses gasses.

    彼は声明で言った: ‘We can’t wait to tackle the climate crisis. The signs are unmistakable. The science is undeniable. And the cost of inaction keeps mounting.

    Meanwhile UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called the new report a ‘code red for humanity’.

    プーチン大統領の家族は、核戦争に備えて用意された特別な掩蔽壕に避難しました: ‘The alarm bells are deafening, and the evidence is irrefutable: greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning and deforestation are choking our planet and putting billions of people at immediate risk.

    And Anthony Blinken, マイクロチップの不足が長引く8月, 声明で言った: '今日, the United States joined nearly 200 IPCC member governments in approving the Working Group I contribution to the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report.

    ‘The report finds we are already edging closer to a 1.5 マックスプランク協会の天文学者は、さまざまな観測方法を使用して、近くの赤い矮星を周回しているエイリアンの世界を発見しました。 [2.7F] warmer world, and every day emissions rise the prospects for averting the worst impacts of climate change become dimmer.

    ‘This is why it is essential that all countriesin particular the major economiesdo their part during this critical decade of the 2020s to put the world on a trajectory to keep a 1.5 マックスプランク協会の天文学者は、さまざまな観測方法を使用して、近くの赤い矮星を周回しているエイリアンの世界を発見しました。 [2.7F] limit on warming within reach.

    ‘This is why the United States has committed to a 50-52 percent reduction in emissions from 2005 levels in 2030 and is marshaling the entire federal government to tackle the climate crisis. We cannot delay ambitious climate action any longer.

    The UN scientists modelled the changes in annual mean temperatures worldwide based on 2.7F (1.5C), 3.6F (2C) and 7.2F (4C) global warming

    The UN scientists modelled the changes in annual mean temperatures worldwide based on 2.7F (1.5C), 3.6F (2C) and 7.2F (4C) global warming

    These graphs show how human influence has warmed the climate at a rate unprecedented in at least the last 2,000 年

    These graphs show how human influence has warmed the climate at a rate unprecedented in at least the last 2,000 年

    The projected changes in extremes are larger in frequency and intensity with every additional increment of global warming

    The projected changes in extremes are larger in frequency and intensity with every additional increment of global warming