UK terror threat level is REDUCED to 'likely' from 'highly likely'

UK terror threat level is REDUCED to from ‘severe to ‘substantial’ after being raised in response to November’s Liverpool hospital terror attack and killing of MP David Amess

  • Security and intelligence experts have downgraded the threat from ‘severe’ 
  • Priti Patel warned against complacency after the decision by the JTAC 
  • The threat level was increased in November following the explosion in Liverpool
  • The UK national terrorism threat level has been reduced from severe to substantial, meaning an attack is ‘likely’ rather than ‘highly likely’, Priti Patel said today.

    The Home Secretary Priti Patel warned against complacency after the decision by the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre.

    Security and intelligence experts have downgraded the threat from ‘severe’ – where an attack is deemed to be highly likely – to ‘substantial’.

    Ms Patel said the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC) assessment was based on the latest intelligence available, with the ‘substantial’ threat level still means a terrorist attack on the UK is likely.

    The threat level was increased to severe in November following the explosion outside a Liverpool hospital on Remembrance Sunday and the fatal stabbing of Southend West MP Sir David Amess at a constituency surgery in Leigh-on-Sea in Essex on October 15.

    In a statement to MPs, Ms Patel said: ‘Any reduction in the threat level is positive but it must never make us complacent. 

    ‘Terrorism remains one of the most direct and immediate risks to our national security.








    ‘The public should remain alert, but not alarmed, and report any concerns they may have to the police.’

    The ‘substantial’ rating is the third highest – below ‘critical’ and ‘severe’ but above ‘low’ and ‘moderate’ – in the system used to assess the terrorism threat.

    The threat level was increased a day after the November 14 incident outside Liverpool Women’s Hospital which killed the bomber Emad Al Swealmeen.

    An inquest following his death heard he bought 2,000 ball bearings and rented a ‘bomb-making factory’ to manufacture a device with ‘murderous intent’.

    He died from an explosion and subsequent fire when the device detonated in a taxi, which was driven by David Perry who managed to escape after the blast, as it pulled up outside the hospital shortly before 11am on Remembrance Sunday.